General Info

According to the English poet T.S. Eliot, April is a turning point, at which the past and the future are seen as one; when, in northern climes at least, Lilac bushes burst into bloom on dusty waste ground or beside railway tracks as the rain brings to life new growth.

  • Theme: Beginnings
  • Plant Energy: Daisy – for a fresh start and new projects.
  • Crystal Power: Diamond – for clarity and empowering goals.

The month was named Aprilis by the Romans, but the origins of the name are still obscure. The traditional belief of its origin stems from the Latin verb aperire, “to open,” an allusion to trees and flowers beginning to open or to flower from buds.

Since some of the Roman months were named in honor of divinities, and as April was sacred to the goddess Venus, it has also been suggested that Aprilis was originally Venus’s mouth, from an ancient combination of her Greek goddess name, Aphrodite, to arrive at her springtime aspect as Aphrilis.

As the sun continues to make its way through the zodiac, it stays in Aries until about the 20th. The first part of the month is still about a feisty, “let’s get things done” energy. This period is about action and is filled with self-motivated people who are as self-centered and conceited as the fiery influence of Mars.

But as the sun moves across the cusp of Taurus, the energy changes to that of Venus. Venus rules Taurus, complementing this earth sign’s symbols of beauty, vanity, good looks, attraction, seduction, feminine wiles, and the concerns of the body and sexuality.

In the late Middle Ages throughout the fashionable European courts, favored sorcerers and witches concocted aphrodisiacs, potions, poisons, particularly in Aprils as it was thought to be a month auspicious for providing male heirs.

The tradition of celebrating virility, along with the magickal generation of sexual stamina and subsequent fertility, were themes based on the ancient fertility festivities of pagan Europe as the first of May approached.

The first few weeks of April were ruled by the virile Ram God, followed by the fertile Cow Goddess, both symbols of various pagan cultures and still invoked by modern day witches. This is why April is a month when desires quicken, the heat rises, and the tonic is needed to leave memories behind and start afresh.

Spells and rituals for April, therefore, tend to be all about moving on and beginning a new way of living, loving, or just being.

From: Spells For A Magical Year

There is a lot to celebrate in April. This is a list of pretty much everything that goes on during the fourth month of the year. Many of these dates change from year to year. The days that change are marked with this » symbol.

April Lore and General Info

Astronomical Events

Astrological Events

Depending on which astrological system you adhere to, these are the signs that show up in April of 2021. Be aware that some of these dates will vary from year to year. Unlike the Sun signs which might just shift by 1 or 2 days, the dates of the various Moon signs will vary widely from year to year. The same holds true for the Chinese Zodiac. The Celtic Tree Signs are based on an arbitrary system and stay the same from year to year.

Western Astrology

The April Sun begins in Aries and finishes up in Taurus:

The 2021 April Moon cycles through the signs as follows.

You will notice that the Moon might begin the day in one sign and by the end of the day may have moved into another sign, so timing matters if you are wanting to be precise.

The Celtic Tree Signs in April:
  • Mar 18 to Apr 14 – Alder Tree Month
  • Apr 15 to May 12 – Willow Tree Month
The Alternative Celtic Zodiac is as follows:
  • Rowan: April 1 – Apr 10
  • Maple: April 11 – Apr 20
  • Walnut: April 21 – Apr 30
The Chinese Calendar and Zodiac

We are currently in the year of the Ox (sometimes referred to as the Cow).  Each Month is also assigned a specific animal. Here’s what shows up in April 2021.

  • Rabbit: Mar 5 – Apr 3 (Chinese Zodiac – Stem Branch Calendar)
  • Rabbit: Mar 13 – Apr 11  (Lunar Calendar – 2nd Lunar Month)
  • Dragon: Apr 4 – May 4 (Chinese Zodiac – Stem Branch Calendar)
  • Dragon: Apr 12 – May 11 (Lunar Calendar – 3rd Lunar Month)

Note: The traditional Chinese Astrology birth chart is built by the Chinese Stem Branch Calendar, not the Chinese Lunar Calendar, which I think is really confusing.  Because of a difference in time zones, the lunar months will have different pattern between China and the USA

Lucky and Unlucky Days

You might want to plan moving, traveling, major purchases, court dates, and weddings around these dates, avoiding the unlucky days and utilizing the lucky ones.

  • These are the lucky days in April:
    6, 15, 16, 20 and 28.
  • These are the unlucky days in April:
    10, 17, 18, 24 and 25.

Fatal Days

The tenth and the eleventh too,
Are ready death’s fell ‘work to do.

Holidays and Holy Days

Many of the holidays begin on the eve of the night before and end on the eve of the day of. It’s also important to remember that the dates of archaic festivals and feast days may vary widely depending on the source.

April 1

  • 1: April Fool’s Day – All Fool’s Day
  • 1: Loki’s Day
  • 1: The Veneralia – the festival of Venus, the Roman goddess of love and beauty
  • 1 » Maundy Thursday

April 2

  • 2 » Good Friday
  • 2 » Lord’s Evening Meal

April 3

  • 3 » Lazarus Saturday

April 4

April 5

April 6

April 7

April 8

April 9

April 10

April 12

April 13

April 14

  • 14: Look Up At The Sky Day
  • 14 » Galungan (Bali) –  Represents the victory of Dharma (virtue) over Adharma (evil).
  • 14 » Samjinnal – Korean holiday announcing the arrival of Spring

April 15

April 17

  • 17: Mahavir Jayanti

April 18

April 19

April 20

  • 20 » Grain Rains (Chinese Farmer’s Calendar)

April 21

April 22

April 23

April 24

  • 24 » Kuningan (Bali)- At the holy spring temple Tirta Empul, people partake  in a ritual purification, bathing in the spring.

April 25

  • 25: The Robigalia – the festival of Robigus, a Roman corn god.

April 26

  • 26 » Boat Blessing – See also Chinese Dragon Boat Festival (June 14)

April 27

  • 27 » Hanuman Jayanti – Birthday of the monkey God

April 28

April 30

Saint Days

There is a surprising amount of magick associated with Saint days. This is a very short list of the Saint days in April, there are many many more. As time goes by I may end up listing them all, but for now, this is what I have.

Recipes For April

Many more seasonal recipes, including recipes for new and full moon ceremonies, ancient Greek and Roman holidays, Asian festivals and etc can be found here: Seasonal Recipes.

Notes:

Any April lore, almanac, astrological, and celebration dates that have been shared after this post was published can be found by searching the April posts to see what’s new.

A lot of work went into this post. It was compiled from various sources by Shirley Twofeathers for The Pagan Calendar, you may repost and share without karmic repercussions, but only if you give me credit and a link back to this website. Blessed be.

The festival calendar of ancient Egypt, as it appears to us now, spans three thousand years of Egyptian history and probably was being recorded, observed, and manipulated many thousands of years before that. In those three millennia a great many political and religious changes affected the designated feast days. Some feasts fell out of favor, others were renamed, a few were entirely forgotten.

Many Egyptian feast days are moveable feasts, that is, they are lunar festivals timed to phases of the moon. Thus their occurrence might slip around from one year to the next. This is similar to how Easter Sunday, (the first Sunday following the first full moon after the vernal equinox), falls on a different date every year.

The Calendar

In any true sense it would be impossible for us to know the actual recurring dates of many of the festivals. We can, however, approximate the ancient dates. The Gregorian Calendar dates given here should not be taken as arbitrary or fixed, I think of them as a suggestion instead.

This particular calendar is from the book Feasts of Light. You may find that the dates of these various festivals are listed differently on other calendars. When planning a celebration in the Egyptian manner, use your intuition and your own understanding of the Lunar Calendar and the Wheel of the Year.

Season of Inundation – Akhet – Winter

During the Season of Inundation more major public festivals occurred than at any other time of the year, most of them related to fertility rites and abundance rituals. The feasts tended to occupy the general public during this time because the land was so flooded that little real work could be done.

Thuthi – The first month of winter

  • 1 – The Rise of Sothis as Isis – July 19
  • 1 – The Opening of the New Year – July 19
  • 7 – The Feast of Anket – July 25
  • 20 – The Inebriety of Hathor – August 7

Paopi – The second month of winter

  • 5 – The Feast of Hathor and Min – August 22
  • 15 – The Opet Festival – September 1
  • 21 – Neith Goes Forth to Atum – September 7

Hethara – The third month of Winter

  • 1 – Hathor’s Birthday Feast – September 17
  • 17 – The Lamentations of Isis – October 3
  • 21 – The Feast Day of Ma’at – October 8
  • 30 – Opening the Bosom of Women – October 16
  • 30 – The Feast of Isis in Busiris – October 16

Koiak – The fourth month of Winter

  • 17 – The Plucking of the Papyrus for Hathor – November 2
  • 27 to 29 – The Osirian Mysteries – November 12 to 14
  • 27 – Isis Seeks the Body of Osiris – November 12
  • 28 – Isis Grieves the Loss of Osiris – November 13
  • 29 – Isis Rejoices as She Finds Osiris – November 14
Season of Sowing – Pert – Spring

Once the waters receded and work in the fields began, the Sowing season was the busiest time of the year.

Tybi – the first month Spring

  • 19 and 20 – The Voyage of Hathor to Nubia – December 4 and 5
  • 20 – Bast Goes Forth from Bubastis – December 5
  • 28 to 30 – The Voyage of Hathor to Egypt and Her Father – December 13 to 15

Mechir – the second month of Spring

  • 1 to 3 – The Voyage of Hathor to Egypt and Her Father( continued) – December 16 to 18
  • 6 – The Feast of Isis the Black Cow – December 21
  • 6 – The Festival of Raising the Djed of Osiris – December 21
  • 10 – The Birth of Ra, Child of Nut – December 25
  • 10 – The Birth of Horus, Child of Isis – December 25
  • 19 – Isis Returns from Phoenicia with Osiris – January 3
  • 21 – The Voyage of Hathor to See Her Seven Sisters – January 4
  • 24 – Isis Greets Min in Coptos – January 8

Pamenot – the third month of Spring

  • 5 – The Brilliant Festival of the Lights of Neith – January 19

Parmuti – the fourth month of Spring

  • 20 – The Blessing of the Fleets by Isis – March 5
  • 28 – Isis Births Horus the Younger – March 13
  • 28 – Hathor Births Ihy – March 13
Season of the Harvest – Shemu – Summer

The growing season was quickly followed by the Harvest season. But during the final months of the year, when the harvest had ended and the land was dry, the festivals began again, mostly in anticipation of the coming Inundation.

Pachons – the first month of Summer

  • 1 – The Feast of the Hand of the God – March 16
  • 6 – The Pregnancy of Isis / Nut – March 21
  • 15 – The Festival of Renenutet – March 30
  • 19 – Isis Finds Osiris – April 3

Payni – the second month of Summer

  • 1 – The Great Festival of Bast at Bubastis – April 15
  • 26 – The Going Forth of Neith along the Water – May 10

Epiphi – the third month of Summer

  • 1 – The Hierogamos of Hathor and Horus – May 15
  • 4 – The Conception of Horus – May 18
  • 5 – Hathor Returns to Punt – May 19
  • 7 – The Sailing of the Gods after the Goddess – May 21
  • 30 – The Festival of Mut: Feeding of the Gods – June 13

Mesore – the fourth month of Summer

  • 3 – The Feast of Raet – June 16
  • 3 – The Feast of Hathor as Sothis – June 16
The Epagomenal Days

The Egyptian year was divided into twelve months of thirty days each, which means that each year was about five days short of the astronomical year. To compensate for this difference, five extra days were added to the year, and (according to this particular calendar) are designated as follows:

  1. The Birthday of Osiris – July 14
  2. The Birthday of Horus the Elder – July 15
  3. The Birthday of Seth – July 16
  4. The Birthday of Isis (The Night of the Cradle) – July 17
  5.  The Birthday of Nephthys – July 18

The Babylonian calendar was a lunisolar calendar with years consisting of 12 lunar months, each beginning when a new crescent moon was first sighted low on the western horizon at sunset, plus an intercalary month inserted as needed by decree.

The year begins in spring, and is divided into reš šatti “beginning”, mišil šatti “middle”, and qīt šatti “end of the year”. The word for “month” was arḫu. The chief deity of the Assyrians is assigned the surplus intercalary month, showing that the calendar originates in Babylonian, and not later Assyrian times.

During the 6th century BC Babylonian captivity of the Hebrews, the Babylonian month names were adopted into the Hebrew calendar. In Iraq and the Levant, the Gregorian solar calendar is used with Arabic names of the Roman months replacing the Latin names.

The Days of the Month

Counting from the new moon, the Babylonians celebrated every seventh day as a “holy-day”, also called an “evil-day” (meaning “unsuitable” for prohibited activities). On these days officials were prohibited from various activities and common men were forbidden to “make a wish”, and the 28th was known as a “rest-day”.

On these days, offerings were made to a different god and goddess at nightfall to avoid the prohibitions:

  • 7th – Marduk and Ishtar
  • 14th – Ninlil and Nergal
  • 21st – Sin and Shamash
  • 28th – Enki and Mah

Tablets from the sixth-century BC reigns of Cyrus the Great and Cambyses II indicate these dates were sometimes approximate. The lunation of 29 or 30 days basically contained three seven-day weeks, and a final week of eight or nine days inclusive, breaking the continuous seven-day cycle.

The Monthly Calendar

Until the 5th century BC, the calendar was fully observational, but beginning about 499 BC the months began to be regulated by a lunisolar cycle of 19 years equaling 235 months. After no more than three isolated exceptions, by 380 BC the months of the calendar were regulated by the cycle without exception. In the cycle of 19 years, the month Adaru 2 was intercalated, except in the year that was number 17 in the cycle, when the month Ulūlu 2 was inserted.

Season – Reš Šatti – Spring – The Beginning – 𒊕𒈬

During this period, the first day of each month (beginning at sunset) is the day when a new crescent moon was first sighted—the calendar never used a specified number of days in any month.

1st Month Araḫ Nisānu 

  • Known as: Month of beginning
  • Symbol: 𒌚𒁈
  • Presiding Deity: Bel
  • Zodiac Sign: Agru (Aries)
  • Current Equivalent: March/April

2nd Month – Araḫ Āru

  • Known as: Month of the Blossoming
  • Symbol: 𒌚𒄞
  • Presiding Deity: Ea
  • Zodiac Sign: Gu (Taurus)
  • Current Equivalent: April/May

3rd Month – Araḫ Simanu

  • Symbol: 𒌚𒋞
  • Presiding Deity: Sin
  • Zodiac Sign: Maštaba (Gemini)
  • Current Equivalent: May/June

4th MonthAraḫ Dumuzu

  • Known as: Month of Tammuz
  • Symbol: 𒌚𒋗
  • Presiding Deity: Tammuz
  • Zodiac Sign: Alluttu (Cancer)
  • Current Equivalent: June/July
Season – Mišil Šatti – Summer/Fall – The Middle – 𒁇𒈬

During this period, the first day of each month (beginning at sunset) is the day when a new crescent moon was first sighted—the calendar never used a specified number of days in any month.

5th Month Araḫ Abu 

  • Symbol: 𒌚𒉈
  • Presiding Deity: Gilgamesh
  • Zodiac Sign: Nēšu (Leo)
  • Current Equivalent: July/August

6th Month Araḫ Ulūlu

  • Symbol: 𒌚𒆥
  • Presiding Deity: Ishtar
  • Zodiac Sign: Sisinnu (Virgo)
  • Current Equivalent: August/September

7th Month – Araḫ Tišritum

  • Known as: Month of Beginning (start of the second half-year)
  • Symbol: 𒌚𒇯
  • Presiding Deity: Shamash
  • Zodiac Sign: Zibānītu (Libra)
  • Current Equivalent: September/October

8th Month – Araḫ Samnu

  • Known as: The Eighth (month)
  • Symbol: 𒌚𒀳
  • Presiding Deity: Marduk
  • Zodiac Sign: Zuqaqīpu (Scorpio)
  • Current Equivalent: October/November
Season – Winter – Qīt Šatti – The End –  𒌀𒈬

During this period, the first day of each month (beginning at sunset) is the day when a new crescent moon was first sighted—the calendar never used a specified number of days in any month.

9th MonthAraḫ Kislimu

  • Symbol: 𒌚𒃶
  • Presiding Deity: Nergal
  • Zodiac Sign: Pabilsag (Sagittarius)
  • Current Equivalent: November/December

10th MonthAraḫ Ṭebētum

  • Known as: Muddy Month
  • Symbol: 𒌚𒀊
  • Presiding Deity: Papsukkal
  • Zodiac Sign: Suḫurmāšu (Capricorn)
  • Current Equivalent: December/January

11th Month –  Araḫ Šabaṭu

  • Symbol: 𒌚𒊭𒉺𒌅
  • Presiding Deity: Adad
  • Zodiac Sign: Gula (Aquarius)
  • Current Equivalent: January/February

12th MonthAraḫ Addaru / Adār

  • Known as: Month of Adar
  • Symbol: 𒌚𒊺
  • Presiding Deity: Erra
  • Zodiac Sign: Zibbātu (Pisces)
  • Current Equivalent: February/March
Intercalary or 13th Month

In year 17 of the 19-year cycle, the intercalary month was named Araḫ Ulūlu – 𒌚𒆥 – Adar II

  • Name:  Araḫ Addaru Arku or Araḫ Makaruša Addari
  • Symbol:  𒌚𒊺𒂕
  • Presiding Deity: Assur
Note:

My source for this calendar is Wikipedia. It is based on a Sumerian (Third Dynasty of Ur) predecessor preserved in the Umma calendar of Shulgi (c. 21st century BC).

The idea of Lunar Days has existed since the beginning of time. Hundreds of years ago, ancient citizens created descriptions for each of the lunar days. These depictions appeared in most astrological rituals. However, traditions vary and so it is up to each individual person to decide which lunar tradition fits their lifestyle and beliefs and suits their needs.

The moment the new Moon occurs marks the birth of the first Lunar Day. The last lunar day, (which might be the 29 or sometimes the 30th Lunar Day), ends when the next New Moon is born. Some traditions begin the Lunar Month counting from the moment the first sliver of the new moon appears on the horizon. If you follow that tradition, your count of Lunar days would begin the day after the New Moon.

The longitude and latitude of certain places will influence the times that the phases of the moon occur, so the dates of each lunar day will vary from place to place and from year to year.

Some lunar months might have a full 30 days whereas some only contain 29 days. The reason for this discrepancy is that the Moon cycle is approximately 29 1/2 days long.

Calculating The Lunar Day

The first lunar day is generally counted from the moment of the new moon.  Many modern day calendars have the New Moon listed. If you want to be exact, the Time and Date website has a moon phase calculator that will give you times and dates for any location you choose.

Since lunar days do not coincide with solar days, the lunar day can begin at any time – in the morning, in the afternoon, in the evening or at night. This means that you might wake up in the morning on the 3rd Lunar Day and enter the 4th Lunar day in the afternoon or evening.

What The Lunar Days Signify

I found a bunch of information about each of the lunar days. Here’s a list of links to each one, along with an abbreviated note about the basic energy of the day:

  • 1st Lunar Day – Creativity Rules
  • 2nd Lunar Day – New Beginnings Continue
  • 3rd Lunar Day – Any Number of Things Could Happen
  • 4th Lunar Day – A Contradictory Day
  • 5th Lunar Day – Generally a Lucky Day
  • 6th Lunar Day – A Most Fortunate Day
  • 7th Lunar Day – Generally A Lucky Day
  • 8th Lunar Day – A Good Day for Travel
  • 9th Lunar Day – Negativity Rules
  • 10th Lunar Day – An Auspicious Day
  • 11th Lunar Day – Energy is Renewed
  • 12th Lunar Day – An Inauspicious Day
  • 13th Lunar Day – Don’t Do Anything Today
  • 14th Lunar Day – Contradictory Day
  • 15th Lunar Day  – A Day for Magick
  • 16th Lunar Day – A Day for Festivities
  • 17th Lunar Day – Family Day
  • 18th Lunar Day – Positive Energy
  • 19th Lunar Day – A Perilous Day
  • 20th Lunar Day – Start Something New
  • 21st Lunar Day – Luck Is On Your Side
  • 22nd Lunar Day – Generally Good
  • 23rd Lunar Day –  Enjoy Yourself
  • 24th Lunar Day – Begin Nothing
  • 25th Lunar Day – Experts Disagree
  • 26th Lunar Day – Not A Lucky Day
  • 27th Lunar Day – A Fortunate Day
  • 28th Lunar Day – A Joyous Day
  • 29th Lunar Day – An Unlucky Day
  • 30th Lunar Day  – Rarely Occurs – Miracles Happen

When calculating these days for your own calendar or event scheduling, be sure to take into account the fact that the moon cycle is actually only 29.5 days in length, which means that the thirtieth day will not happen very often.

Also, bear in mind that different traditions have different interpretations of each of the individual days and what they might mean. As always, it’s best to read the information and make up your own mind based on what feels right to you.

Sources:

There is a lot to celebrate in March. This is a list of pretty much everything that goes on during the third month of the year. Many of these dates change from year to year. The days that change are marked with this » symbol.

March Lore and General Info

Astronomical Events

Astrological Events

Depending on which astrological system you adhere to, these are the signs that show up in March of 2021. Be aware that some of these dates will vary from year to year. Unlike the Sun signs which might just shift by 1 or 2 days, the dates of the various Moon signs will vary widely from year to year. The same holds true for the Chinese Zodiac. The Celtic Tree Signs are based on an arbitrary system and stay the same from year to year.

Western Astrology

The March Sun begins in Pisces and finishes up in Aries:

The March 2021 Moon cycles through the signs as follows. You will notice that the Moon might begin the day in one sign and by the end of the day may have moved into another sign, so timing matters if you are wanting to be precise:

The Celtic Tree Signs in March:
  • Feb 18 to Mar 17 – Ash Tree Month
  • Mar 18 to Apr 14 – Alder Tree Month
  • Mar 21 – Vernal Equinox – Gorse Tree Day
The Alternative Celtic Zodiac is as follows:
  • Pine: Feb 21 – Mar 2
  • Willow: Mar 3 – Mar 12
  • Lime: Mar 13 – Mar 20
  • Oak: Mar 21 (Vernal Equinox) –  Sign of the Oak Tree
  • Hazel: Mar 22 – Mar 31
The Chinese Calendar and Zodiac

We are currently in the year of the Ox (sometimes referred to as the Cow).  Each Month is also assigned a specific animal. Here’s what shows up in March 2021.

  • Tiger: Feb 3 –  Mar 4 (Chinese Zodiac – Stem Branch Calendar)
  • Tiger: Feb 12 – Mar 12 (Lunar Calendar – 1st Lunar Month)
  • Rabbit: Mar 5 – Apr 3 (Chinese Zodiac – Stem Branch Calendar)
  • Rabbit: Mar 13 – Apr 11  ( Lunar Calendar – 2nd Lunar Month)

Note: The traditional Chinese Astrology birth chart is built by the Chinese Stem Branch Calendar, not the Chinese Lunar Calendar, which I think is really confusing.  Because of a difference in time zones, the lunar months will have different pattern between China and the USA.

Lucky and Unlucky Days

You might want to plan moving, traveling, major purchases, court dates, and weddings around these dates, avoiding the unlucky days and utilizing the lucky ones.

  • These are the lucky days in March:
    10 and 24.
  • These are the unlucky days in March:
    1, 2, 5, 8, 12, 14, 16, 28 and 29.

Fatal Days

The first the greedy glutton slays,
The fourth cuts short the drunkard’s days.

Holidays and Holy Days

Many of the holidays begin on the eve of the night before and end on the eve of the day of. It’s also important to remember that the dates of archaic festivals and feast days may vary widely depending on the source.

March 1

  • 1: Matronalia – the Festival of Women
  • 1: New Year’s Day in the old Roman calendar.
  • 1: Mother March
  • 1: Feriae Marti – Festival of Mars
  • 1 thru 9: Navajo Sing – Festival in which fields are blessed in preparation for planting.

March 2

  • 2: Holy Wells Day – the day of Ceadda, the Celtic goddess of healing springs and holy wells.

March 3

  • 3: Aegir’s Day (Teutonic) – sometimes called the Celtic Sea Festival
  • 3: Creation Day
  • 3: Momo no Sekku – Peach Festival
  • 3: Hina Matsuri – Girl’s Festival, or Doll Festival

March 4

  • 4: The Anestheria – Greek festival of flowers
  • 4: Feast of Rhiannon
  • 4: Maha Shivaratri – Great Night of Shiva, Vigil and feast for Transcendence

March 5

March 6

March 7

  • 7 thru 14: Lesser Eleusinian Mysteries. Old Greek festival celebrating the marriage of Goddess Kore and God Dionysos, following their return from Elysium.

March 8

March 9

March 10

  • 10: The Daedala
  • 10: Hypatia’s Day
  • 10 thru 12 » Melasti (Bali) – A purification ceremony that takes place at the beach several days prior to Nyepi.

March 11

March 12

March 13

March 14

March 15

March 16

  • 16 thru 17: Bacchanalia – The festival of Bacchus, the Roman god of wine

March 17

March 19

  • 19: Festival of Anna Perenna – the Roman goddess of the circle of the year.
  • 19 thru 23: The Mivervalia and Quinquatria, main festivals of Minerva, the Roman goddess of war, wisdom arts and trades.

March 20

March 21

March 22

March 23

March 24

March 25

March 26

March 27

March 28

  • 28: Ragnar Lodbrok`s Day – a celebration in honor of the sacking of Paris
  • 28 » Palm Sunday
  • 28 thru 29 » Holi

March 29

March 30

March 31

  • 31 » Holy Wednesday
  • 31 » Ascent of the Christ of the Gypsies
  • 31: Festival of Luna – the Roman goddess of the moon

 

Saint Days

There is a surprising amount of magick associated with Saint days This is a very short list of the Saint days in March, there are many many more. As time goes by I may end up listing them all, but for now, this is what I have.

Recipes For March

Many seasonal recipes, including recipes for new and full moon ceremonies, ancient Greek and Roman holidays, Asian festivals and etc can be found here: Seasonal Recipes.

Notes:

Any March lore, almanac, astrological, and celebration dates that have been shared after this post was published can be found by searching the March posts to see what’s new.

A lot of work went into this post. It was which was compiled from various sources by Shirley Twofeathers for The Pagan Calendar, you may repost and share without karmic repercussions, but only if you give me credit and a link back to this website. Blessed be.

There is a lot to celebrate in February. This is a list of pretty much everything that goes on during the second month of the year. Many of these dates change from year to year. The days that change are marked with this » symbol.

February Lore and General Info:

Astronomical Events

Astrological Events

Depending on which astrological system you adhere to, these are the signs that show up in February of 2021. Be aware that some of these dates will vary from year to year. Unlike the Sun signs which might just shift by 1 or 2 days, the dates of the various Moon signs will vary widely from year to year. The same holds true for the Chinese Zodiac. The Celtic Tree Signs are based on an arbitrary system and stay the same from year to year.

Western Astrology

The February Sun begins in Aquarius and finishes up in Pisces:

The February 2021 Moon cycles through the signs as follows. You will notice that the Moon might begin the day in one sign and by the end of the day may have moved into another sign, so timing matters if you are wanting to be precise:

The moon cycles through the signs are as follows:

The Celtic Tree Signs in February:
The Alternative Celtic Zodiac is as follows:
  • Poplar: Feb 1 – Feb 10
  • Larch: Feb 11 – Feb 20
  • Pine: Feb 21 – Mar 2
The Chinese Calendar and Zodiac

The month of February begins in the Chinese Year of the Rat. The year of the Ox (sometimes referred to as the Cow) kicks in on February 12th  (Chinese lunar New Year Day) and lasts until January 31st, 2022. This will be a White Metal Ox year. Each Month is also assigned a specific animal. Here’s what shows up in February 2021.

  • Cow: Jan 5 – Feb  2 (Chinese Zodiac)
  • Cow: Jan 13 – Feb 12 (Lunar Calendar – 12th Lunar Month)
  • Tiger: Feb 3 –  Mar 4 (Chinese Zodiac)
  • Tiger: Feb 12 – Mar 12 (Lunar Calendar – 1st Lunar Month)

Note: The traditional Chinese Astrology birth chart is built by the Chinese Stem Branch Calendar, not the Chinese Lunar Calendar, which I think is really confusing.  Because of a difference in time zones, the lunar months will have different pattern between China and the USA.

Lucky and Unlucky Days

You might want to plan moving, traveling, major purchases, court dates, and weddings around these dates, avoiding the unlucky days and utilizing the lucky ones.

  • These are the lucky days in February:
    11, 21, 25, and 26.
  • These are the unlucky days in February:
    1, 3, 7, 9, 12, 16, 17, 18 and 23.

Fatal Days

The fourth day bringeth down to death,
The third will stop a strong man’s breath.

Holidays and Holy Days

Many of the holidays begin on the eve of the night before and end on the eve of the day of. It’s also important to remember that the dates of archaic festivals and feast days may vary widely depending on the source.

February 1

February 2

February 3

  • 3 » Pagerwesi (Bali) celebrates Sang Hyang Pramesti Guru, god of teachers and creator of the universe. Offerings are made to stave off evil forces, and also for the uncremated dead.
  • 3 » Bean Throwing Ceremony (Shinto)
  • 3: Setsubun

February 4

February 5

February 6

February 7

February 8

February 9

  • 9: Feast of Apollo

February 11

February 12

February 13

  • 13 » Celebrating The Agathos Daimon
  • 13 » Tumpek Landep (Bali) – Celebration of all tools and appliances made of iron.
  • 13 thru 21: The Parentalis – festival to honor the spirits of the ancestors

February 14

  • 14: St. Valentine’s Day
  • 14: Feast of Vali
  • 14 » Meatfare Sunday
  • 14 » Transfiguration Sunday
  • 14 » Cheese Fare Sunday

February 15

  • 15: Sigfrid’s Day
  • 15: Lupercalia – the festival of Lupercus, the Roman god of flocks and fertility.
  • 15: Kamakura Day

February 16

February 17

  • 17 : Feast of Shesmu
  • 17 » Ash Wednesday
  • 17 » The 40 days of Lent begin
  • 17: Toshigoi – Shinto rite honoring the Kami and offering prayers for a bountiful rice harvest.
  • 17: Festival of Quirinus – god of war, storms and thunder

February 18

  • 18: Feast of Our Lady of Lourdes
  • 18 and 19: Spenta Armaiti (Zoroastrian)
  • 18: Rain Water begins (Chinese Farmer’s Calendar)

February 19

February 20

  • 20: Day of Tacita

February 21

  • 21: Feralia – an ancient Roman Day of the Dead
  • 21: Toshi-goi-no-Matsuri known (also as the Yakuyoke festival) – Shinto rite honoring the Kami and offering prayers for a bountiful rice harvest.

February 22

  • 22: Caristia – Roman holiday of family reunions

February 23

February 24

  • 24: Flight of the King – Regifugium

February 25

  • 25: Day of Mut

February 26

February 28

  • 28: Saxon Cake Day – cakes offered to the God and the Goddess.
  • 28: Kalevala Day – the epic poem, Kalevala is celebrated by the Finns.
  • 28: Old Slavic Velja Noc – Spirits of the dead visit their living relatives, overseen by Veles, Lord of the Dead.

Saint Days

There is a surprising amount of magick associated with Saint days This is a very short list of the Saint days in February, there are many many more. As time goes by I may end up listing them all, but for now, this is what I have.

Recipes For February

Many more seasonal recipes, including recipes for new and full moon ceremonies, ancient Greek and Roman holidays, Asian festivals and etc can be found here: Seasonal Recipes.

Notes:

Any February lore, almanac, astrological, and celebration dates that have been shared after this post was published can be found by searching the February posts to see what’s new.

A lot of work went into this post. It was compiled from various sources by Shirley Twofeathers for The Pagan Calendar, you may repost and share without karmic repercussions, but only if you give me credit and a link back to this website. Blessed be.

There is a lot to celebrate in January. This is a list of pretty much everything that goes on during this first month of the year. Many of these dates change from year to year. The days that change are marked with this » symbol.

Astronomical Events

Astrological Events

Depending on which astrological system you adhere to, these are the signs that show up in January of 2021. Be aware that some of these dates will vary from year to year. Unlike the Sun signs which might just shift by 1 or 2 days, the dates of the various Moon signs will vary widely from year to year. The same holds true for the Chinese Zodiac. The Celtic Tree Signs are based on an arbitrary system and stay the same from year to year.

Western Astrology

The January Sun begins in Capricorn and finishes up in Aquarius:

The January 2021 Moon cycles through the signs as follows. You will notice that the Moon might begin the day in one sign and by the end of the day may have moved into another sign, so timing matters if you are wanting to be precise:

The Celtic Tree Signs in January:
The Alternative Celtic Zodiac is as follows:
  • Apple: Dec 22 – Jan 1
  • Fir: Jan 2 – Jan 11
  • Elm: Jan 12 – Jan 22
  • Cypress: Jan 23 – Jan 31
The Chinese Calendar and Zodiac

According to the Chinese Zodiac we are currently in the Year of the Rat. Each Moon is also assigned a specific animal. Here’s what shows up in January 2021.

  • Rat: Dec 7 – Jan 4 (Stem Branch Calendar)
  • Rat: Dec 15 – Jan 12  (Lunar Calendar – 11th Lunar Month)
  • Cow: Jan 5 – Feb  2 (Stem Branch Calendar)
  • Cow: Jan 13 – Feb 12 (Lunar Calendar – 12th Lunar Month)

Note: The traditional Chinese Astrology birth chart is built by the Chinese Stem Branch Calendar, not the Chinese Lunar Calendar, which I think is really confusing.  Because of a difference in time zones, the lunar months will have different pattern between China and the USA.

Lucky and Unlucky Days

You might want to plan moving, traveling, major purchases, court dates, and weddings around these dates, avoiding the unlucky days and utilizing the lucky ones. Interestingly, the 1st and the 2nd are both lucky and unlucky.

  • These are the lucky days in January:
    1, 2, 15, 26, 27 and 28.
  • These are the unlucky days in January:
    1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 11, 12, 13, 14, 20 and 21.

Fatal Days

Of this first month the opening day
And seventh, like a sword will slay.

January Lore and General Info:

Holidays and Holy Days

Many of the holidays begin on the eve of the night before and end on the eve of the day of. It’s also important to remember that the dates of archaic festivals and feast days may vary widely depending on the source.

January 1

  • 1: New Year’s Day
  • 1: Shichi Fukujin – Seven Deities of Luck Celebration
  • 1: Gantan-sai – Shinto New Year Holy Day, see also Shogatsu
  • 1: Ethics Day – Day to commit to cultivating personal honor.
  • 1: Taos Pueblo Turtle Dance
  • 1: Apple Gifting Day
  • 1: Daisy Day
  • 1 thru 3: Kalends of January
  • 1 thru 4: Tewa Turtle Dance – celebrating life and the first Creation, when Sky Father embraced Earth Mother and all life was conceived.
  • 1 thru 6: Shogatsu/Shinto New Year’s Festival – The Kami (Nature Spirits) of the four directions are honored, and prayers for happiness, good health, and prosperity are made.

January 2

January 3

  • 3: Festival of Pax – alternative date Jan 30
  • 3: Snow Day

January 4

January 5

January 6

January 7

  • 7: Russian Christmas
  • 7: Nativity of Christ
  • 7: Genna – Ethiopian Christmas
  • 7: Koshogatsu – Shinto rite honoring Goddess Izanami, partner of God Izanagi.
  • 7: Feast of Sekhmet – Egyptian New Year’s Day (alternative date Aug 7)

January 8

January 9

January 10

  • 10: Geraint’s Day (Welsh)

January 11

January 12

January 13

  • 13 thru 25: Mid Winter Blot (Midvetr, Midvetrarblot, Jordblot, Thorrablot, Freyrblot) – Old Norse Mid Winter Feast.

January 14

January 15

January 16

January 17

January 19

January 20

  • 20: World Religions Day
  • 20 » Severe Cold begins (Chinese Farmer’s Calendar)
  • 20 » Bodhi Day

January 21

  • 21 thru 23: Mahayana New Year

January 22

January 24

January 25

January 27

  • 27 thru 28 » Tu B’shvat – New Year for Trees
  • 27 thru Feb 3: Powamu Festival (Hopi) – dates vary, an 8 day festival held around the end of January or beginning of February

January 28

January 29

  • 29: Gamelion Noumenia – Old Greek festival honoring all the Gods and Goddesses.
  • 29: Red Carnation Day

January 30

  • 30: Up Helly Aa – Scottish Viking celebration
  • 30 » Saraswati Day (Bali), in honor of Batari Dewi Saraswati, the goddess of knowledge. No reading or writing is allowed on this day, books are taken to the goddess to be blessed.
  • 30 thru 31: Feast of the Charities – dates vary widely also listed as  Jan 17 – 18, Apr 18 – 19, May 26, Jul 9 – 10, or Oct 13.
  • 30 thru Feb. 2: Februalia

January 31

  • 31: Disfest/Disablot
  • 31 » Banyu Pinaruh – Balinese go, at dawn, to beaches, rivers or other water sources, to pray for wisdom and to purify themselves.
  • 31 thru Feb 3: Old European Lunar New Year – Celebration of the Triple Goddess (Goddess of the Moon and the Seasons) being transformed from the Crone into the Virgin; celebrated with ritual bathing of divine images.
  • 31 thru Feb 8: Navajo Sing – Festival in preparation for the coming agricultural season; celebrated with prayer, chanting, dancing, and healing.

 

Saint Days

There is a surprising amount of magick associated with Saint days This is a very short list of the Saint days in January, there are many many more. As time goes by I may end up listing them all, but for now, this is what I have.

Recipes For January

Many seasonal recipes, including recipes for new and full moon ceremonies, ancient Greek and Roman holidays, Asian festivals and etc can be found here: Seasonal Recipes.

Notes:

Any January lore, almanac, astrological, and celebration dates that have been shared after this post was published can be found by searching the January posts to see what’s new.

A lot of work went into this post. It was compiled from various sources by Shirley Twofeathers for The Pagan Calendar, you may repost and share without karmic repercussions, but only if you give me credit and a link back to this website. Blessed be.

From The Power Path, we have this article about the theme for March 2019. I think it could be applied to the current month of March as well.

The main theme for March is “THE NEXT STEP.”  In taking that “next step”, we are also dealing with anxiety, fear, confusion and trusting the unknown.

We exit the month of February with lots of bits and pieces on our plate. Some are clear, some make no sense, some fit the puzzle, some don’t, some have come out of the blue creating sudden change, and some feel like road blocks with no clear solution……yet. There will be those of you that begin this month in a slight state of overwhelm and anxiety. Others will be excited about the possibilities and ready to launch into that next step. A lot was put into motion last month and some of it is just beginning to manifest.

The “next step” is on everyone’s mind. We all know that we are moving forward in some way. Some of you know exactly what that is and are chomping at the bit to get there already. But for many there are still unknowns, loose ends and gaps in clarity that may be producing anxiety, worry and fear. We know we are going somewhere, creating something new, we just do not have all the parts together yet, and the fear is that we will fail or be disappointed and unsuccessful in reaching our goals.

As we evolve, we are inevitably moving into a higher octave, a higher vibration, the upper room. But our fears are holding us back as we cling to what we know, as unsatisfying as that may be. There is no stopping the evolutionary process. It is like telling your hair or fingernails not to grow. The more you cling and hold back, the greater the possibility you will end up in depression and despair with blocked creativity and a feeling of stagnation.

Will we survive? Of course, we will, but our instinctive centers are not convinced of this. They will dig out from our subconscious every reason not to take a risk towards improvement and stir up every fear from the past causing us to worry and be anxious about what has not yet happened. If you are waking up in the middle of the night with anxiety that has no connection to anything in your life, this is the instinctive center reacting to the collective non-specific anxiety triggered by change and what has been activated

What we need this month is to quiet the mind, nurture the body, and eliminate the worry about the future by staying present as much as possible. When you are focused on the present, the past disappears and the future does not yet exist. What does it mean to be present? Being present is a constant discipline of pulling your attention away from the past and the future and staying focused on what is right in front of you. This requires trust in right timing and that your unseen support system will guide you to the right place at the right time and keep you on that golden line towards your intentions, your true path.

Because the future we are dreaming up is filled with unknowns, the mind cannot process the next step and has no information for us about how to get where we wish to go.  The good news is that the greater dreams and intentions have already been put into motion and we just have to get out of the way and allow them to manifest without micromanaging the details or focusing on what seems to be negative and destructive around us. Since the mind only pulls information from what it knows from past experiences, it cannot possibly have the information about the future until the future becomes the present. Therefore, “the next step” requires trusting in the unknown and being fully present to take advantage of the opportunities that show up, some suddenly, and some little by little.

The whirlwind of action, change, disruption and chaos will get a reprieve this month as Mercury goes retrograde on the 5th for three weeks. As inconvenient as this can be for communication, timing and mishaps, it does give us the opportunity to take a breath, look at all the pieces and see where they either fit or do not fit into our next step. Everyone has a next step and there is always a next step. It is important this month to honor and focus on what the next step is so you don’t get stuck in the despairing thought that this is as good as it gets.

So, set your intention from what has been activated last month. Include your passion and emotional enthusiasm. Set it on the golden line. Calm the instinctive center of its fear and anxiety. Keep a “don’t know mind”. Trust the unknown. Set good boundaries against other peoples’ drama, fear and anxiety. Have some fun! Life is an Adventure and Adventure is one of the needs of the year, so enjoy!

Here is a list of the pagan, religious, and secular holidays for February 2020 that have thus far been shared here on The Pagan Calendar. As you can see I have divided it into sections with the almanac and astrological dates listed separately.

Almanac:

Astrological Info – The Sun:

Astrological Info – The Moon:

Lucky and Unlucky Days:

  • February has 4 days that are lucky
    11, 21, 25, and 26.
  • February has 7 days that are unlucky
    3, 7, 9, 12, 16, 17 and 23.

February Lore and General Info:

Celebrations Around The World

Best Days:

  • Plant above ground crops: 1, 2, 5, 6, 23, 24, 28, 29
  • Plant root crops: 11 – 14, 18, 19
  • Plant flowers: 5, 6, 11, 12
  • Transplant: 13, 14
  • Seed beds: 5, 6, 13, 14
  • Tend hydroponics:  6, 7, 24, 25
  • Prune to encourage growth: 11 – 14, 18, 19
  • Prune to discourage growth: 25, 26
  • Apply chemical fertilizer: 5, 6, 23, 24
  • Apply organic fertilizer: 13, 14
  • Destroy weeds: 9, 10, 20, 21, 22
  • Control pests:  16 – 18, 21 – 23
  • Harvest crops: 15 – 17, 20 – 22
  • Wean: 15 – 24
  • Kill farm meat: 13 – 15
  • Set hens and incubators: 1 – 8
  • Castrate: 1, 18 – 29

Any February lore, almanac, astrological, and celebration dates that have been shared after this post was published can be found by searching the February posts to see what’s new.

If an image has posted without permission please leave a comment and I will happily remove it, replace it, give credit, link love ~ whatever you prefer.

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