Pagan Calendar

Dwynwen was Wales’ patron saint of lovers, and January 25th is the Welsh equivalent to St Valentine’s Day. However, it is a romantic country, and they also celebrate St Valentine’s day on 14 February!

She is also known as:

  • Dwyn
  • Donwen
  • Donwenna
  • Dunwen

Her most well known saying is “Nothing wins hearts like cheerfulness

The story of Dwynwen dates back to the 5th century. She was a beautiful Celtic princess, the prettiest of all the King of Wales’s 24 daughters (Brychan Brycheiniog of Brechon also had 11 sons!).

Dwynwen was in deeply in love with the handsome Maelon Dafodrill, but her father had already betrothed her to another, so he refused to give them his consent. On finding out, Maelon cruelly forced himself upon her and fled. With a broken heart, and grieved to have upset her father, Dwynwen ran to the woods and begged God to make her forget her love for Maelon.

Exhausted and aungished, Dwynwen eventually fell asleep. Whilst dreaming, an angel visited her and left a sweet smelling potion. This would erase all memories of Maelon, and his callous heart would also be cooled, but so much so that he turned to ice. Dwynwen was horrified to find her love frozen solid. She prayed again to God, who answered her prayers by granting her three wishes.

Her first wish was to have Maelon thawed and for him to forget her; her second, to have God look kindly on the hopes and dreams of true lovers whilst mending the broken hearts of the spurned; and her third was for her to never marry, but to devote the remainder of her life to God, as thanks for saving Maelon.

Dwynwen devoted the rest of life to God’s service. She became a nun and lived on Llanddwyn Island on the western coast of Ynys Mon (Anglesey), an area accessible only at low tide. She founded a church there, remains of which can still be seen today. After her death she was declared the Welsh Patron Saint of Lovers and ever since, Welsh lovers have looked to St Dwynwen for her help in courting their true love, or for forgetting a false one.

On the island there is a well where, according to legend, a sacred fish (an eel) swims. It is said that the eel can predict the happiness of relationships.

Her well, a fresh-water spring called Ffynnon Dwynwen, became a wishing well and place of pilgrimage, particularly for lovers because of the story above. The tradition grew that the eel in the well could foretell the future for lovers – ask questions and watch which way they turn. Women would scatter breadcrumbs on the surface, then lay her handkerchief on water’s surface; if the eel disturbed it, her lover would be faithful.

Visitors still go to the well today, hoping that the water will boil, meaning that love and good luck will follow them. Her well continues to be a place of pilgrimage; there’s a tradition that if the fish in the well are active when a couple visits, it’s the sign of a faithful husband.

Visitors would leave offerings at her shrine, and so popular was this place of pilgrimage that it became the richest in the area during Tudor times. This funded a substantial chapel that was built in the 16th century on the site of Dwynwen’s original chapel.

Prayer To St Dwynwen

Oh Blessed St. Dwynwen, you who knew pain and peace, division and reconciliation. You have promised to aid lovers and you watch over those whose hearts have been broken. As you received three boons from an Angel, intercede for me to receive 3 blessings to obtain my heart’s desire (state request) and if that is not God’s will, a speedy healing from my pain; your guidance and assistance that I may find love with the right person, at the right time, and in a right way; and an unshakeable faith in the boundless kindness and wisdom of God and this I ask in the name of Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

St. Dwynwen, we beseech thee, comfort lovers whose vision is unclear. Send mending to those with love lost. Protect companions. In your name we seek to do the same. In your name we choose love first. With the love of you, Mary and of Jesus Christ. Amen.

Sources:

Thousands of working class Bolivians crowd the streets of La Paz every year to buy miniature cars, houses and wads of fake dollar bills representing their dreams of wealth.

Alasitas is a 3-week long fair that, in La Paz, takes place beginning on the 24th of January and in Santa Cruz takes place in September. “Alasitas” is an Aymaran word that means “buy me”, and is the name of the annual fair where people buy miniature items that represent things they hope to attain within the year.

The festival is held in honor of the indigenous “god of bounty” or “abundance” called Ekeko (sometimes spelled Ekkekko, or Ekkeko). He is often rendered as a short, pudgy, mustached man who wears traditional Andean clothes and carries baskets of grains. Tiny items, from kitchen appliances to college diplomas, are taken home and placed around Ekeko, who the Aymara people believe will bless them with better lives in the coming year.

Hundreds accompany the Bolivian deity statuette “illa of Ekeko” as it is driven to the Alasitas Fair. Andean religious leaders carry urns with burning incense in a procession of the Bolivian deity statuette “illa of Ekeko” as it is driven to the Fair. The pre-Columbian figurine that symbolizes abundance was recently returned to Bolivia by the National Museum of Berna in Switzerland, 156 years after being taken away from its native country.

Images of Ekeko and other items, such as imitation bank notes are blessed during the festivities. The Ekeko statuette is traditionally given a cigarette, sprinkled with alcohol and surrounded with all the miniature items bought at the Alasitas Fair “so our wishes come true that year.”

Ekeko is the household god and it is not unusual for Bolivians to have a representation of this short and chubby, happy-looking fellow with a mustache and dressed in Andean clothes in their home. To ensure good luck the statue should be received as a gift and not be personally bought. Ekeko brings wealth to the family and keeps misfortune at bay.

To obtain the favor of fortune, Bolivians like to present Ekeko with miniatures – mostly made of a sugary substance – of things they would like to own. This can be a house, a car, furniture, clothes, an airplane but also food. A miniature passport may be bought if one has the wish to travel, a university diploma in case one wants to study or when graduation is near.

Perfectly copied miniature dollar and euro notes are favored over local bolivianos when a devotee wants wealth. Ekeko loves smoking, his statue has a special hole in the mouth for a cigarette.

During Alasitas, the streets are crammed with people who need to buy their miniatures replicas in time – the blessings will take place around noon and they should be prepared by then.

Alasitas’ main divinity is Ekeko, but Catholic priests give their blessing to the newly acquired miniature goods as well, while simultaneously honoring the Virgin of La Paz. Whereas the Franciscans focus on the Virgin, the yatiris – the local wizards – focus on Ekeko; the average Bolivian cares about both.

There is not one conclusive theory about how and where the festival started. In the Aymará language, alasitas means ‘buy from me’ and in pre-colonial times Alasitas was always celebrated in September (Bolivian springtime), to ensure a good crop. It is said that the Spanish changed the date to January 24 in commemoration of an indigenous uprising in 1781 and the siege of La Paz by Tupac Katari.

During the colonization the Spanish tried to force Catholicism on the indigenous people. They partly succeeded and many Bolivians converted to Catholicism, however, in reality the Bolivian religion became a mix of Catholicism and traditional Andean beliefs and rituals, which is easily recognized during, for instance, Alasitas.

Sources:

Tu Bishvat occurs on the 15th day of the Hebrew month of Shevat. In 2019, this date falls on January 20. Tu Bishvat (Tu B’Shevat), also called “Rosh HaShanah La’Ilanot” (New Year of the Trees) is kind of like a birthday for all trees. Trees planted before this day, even by one day, will turn a year older on Tu Bishvat. Traditionally fruit from trees may not be eaten for the first four years, so the age is important.

Here are some simple ways to celebrate The New Year of the Trees

  • Pick fresh fruits and vegetables at a local farm.
  • Plant trees, seeds, or start an herb garden.
  • Build a birdhouse to hang in a tree.
  • Eat the seven significant species of the land of Israel: wheat, grapes, barley, figs, pomegranates, olives, and dates.
  • Organize a park clean-up to collect litter.
  • Make something for your home with reclaimed wood.
  • Take some time to research your own ancestry and assemble your family tree.
  • Commit to recycling paper goods. If you don’t already have one, get a separate bin and you’re all set!
  • Host a Tu B’Shevat Seder.

In the 16th century, the kabbalist Rabbi Yitzchak Luria of Safed developed a Tu Bishvat seder. The fruits and trees of Israel were given symbolic meaning. Eating ten specific fruits and drinking four cups of wine in a specific order while reciting blessings would bring people and the world closer to spiritual perfection.

How to Lead a Tu Bishvat Seder

Set up your table as for Passover: white or other nice tablecloth, good dishes, flowers, wine, and juice. There is no requirement to light candles, but scented candles add a nice touch and a festive glow. Either one person can lead the seder, reciting each reading and making the blessings, or everyone can take turns.

The directions concerning which fruit to locate and the mix of the wines should be read aloud. As each piece of fruit and each cup of wine is being considered and blessed, that object is held by the reader. After each blessing, the participants taste the fruit or sip the wine.

Hand Washing

Fill a large bowl with flower-scented water and float a small cup in it. Carry the bowl from person to person or set up a washing station in a corner. Feel how nice it is to place your hands over the bowl and have someone pour warm water over your fingers. Have towels ready.

Say this blessing

Barukh ata Adonai,
Eloheinu Melekh ha-olam,
asher kidshanu b’mitzvotav,
v’tzivanu al netilat yadayim.

Blessed are You,
Source of all life,
Who commands us to ritually wash our hands.

Note:  Some may choose to forego this blessing, since it is traditionally recited upon washing the hands before eating bread, which is not eaten here.

First reading

Reader: And God said: Let the earth put forth grass, herb-yielding seed, and fruit-tree-bearing fruit after its own kind, wherein is the seed thereof, on the earth. (Genesis 1:11)

Reader: In the 16th century in northern Israel, in the spiritual town of Tzfat (Safed), the Jewish mystics created the Tu Bishvat seder. They recognized the many and varied dimensions of God’s creation and used the fruits of Israel to symbolize their existence.

The First Cup of Wine

This cup of white wine or grape juice symbolizes winter and the mystical dimension of atzilut, or emanation, at which God’s energy infused the creation process with initial life.

Barukh ata Adonai,
Eloheinu Melekh ha-olam borei peri ha-gafen.

Blessed are you,
Source of all life,
Creator of the fruit of the vine.

Reader: For Adonai your God is bringing you into a good land. A land of brooks of water, of fountains and depths springing forth in valleys and hills, a land of wheat and barley and vines and fig trees and pomegranates, a land of olive trees and honey, a land wherein you shall eat without scarceness, you shall not lack anything in it; a land whose stones are iron and out of whose hills you may dig brass. And you shall eat and be satisfied, and bless God for the good land, which is being given unto you (Deuteronomy 8:7-10).

The First Fruit

Fruit that is hard on the outside and soft on the inside, such as walnuts, coconuts or almonds. The hard shell symbolizes the protection that the earth gives us and reminds us to nourish the strength and healing power of our own bodies.

Barukh ata Adonai,
Eloheinu Melekh ha-olam,
borei peri ha-etz.

Blessed are You,
Source of all life,
Creator of the fruit of the tree.

The Second Cup of Wine

This cup of wine or grape juice is mostly white, with a little red mixed in, to symbolize the passing of the seasons and the mystical concept of formation and birth, often associated with water.

Barukh ata Adonai,
Eloheinu Melekh ha-olam,
borei peri ha-gafen.

Blessed are You,
Source of all life,
Creator of the fruit of the vine.

Reader: Blessed shall you be in the city, and blessed shall you be in the field. Blessed shall you be in the fruit of your body, and the fruit of your land, and the fruit of your cattle, and the young of your flock. Blessed shall you be in your basket and your kneading trough. Blessed shall you be when you come in and blessed shall you be when you go out (Deuteronomy 28:36).

The Second Fruit

This fruit is soft with a pit in the center — olives or dates [or peaches, apricots, etc.] — and symbolizes the life-sustaining power that emanates from the earth. It reminds us of the spiritual and emotional strength that is within each of us.

Barukh ata Adonai,
Eloheinu Melekh ha-olam,
borei peri ha-etz.

Blessed are You,
Source of all life,
Creator of the fruit of the tree.

The Third Cup of Wine

This cup of wine is mostly red with a little of white mixed in and symbolizes once again the change of seasons and the mystical concept of beriah, or creation.

Barukh ata Adonai,
Eloheinu Melekh ha-olam,
borei peri ha-gafen.

Blessed are You,
Source of all life,
Creator of the fruit of the vine.

Reader: Then God formed the human from the dust of the ground, and breathed into the nostrils the breath of life; and the human became a living soul (Genesis 2:7).

The Third Fruit

This fruit is soft throughout and is completely edible, such as figs, grapes, and raisins. This type symbolizes God’s omnipresence and our own inextricable ties with the earth.

Barukh ata Adonai,
Eloheinu Melekh ha-olam,
borei peri ha-etz.

Blessed are You,
Source of all life,
Creator of the fruit of the tree.

Serve a Vegetarian Dinner

A favorite is vegetarian lasagna and noodle kugel with fruit. Eat other exotic fruits that are placed around the table.

The Fourth Cup of Wine

This cup is all red, symbolizing the mystical concept of fire and the idea that within all living things dwells a spark of God.

Reader: And the angel of God appeared to him in a flame of fire out of the midst of a bush; and Moses looked, and behold, the bush burned with fire and the bush was not consumed (Exodus 3:2).

The Fourth Fruit

This has a tough skin on the outside but sweet fruit within–mangos, bananas, avocados, or sabra, a desert pear–and symbolizes the mystery of the world and our study of Torah. We are constantly seeking to uncover her secrets, and are continually nourished by her fruits.

Sources:

According to the book, 365 Goddess, January 19, is the day given to the Water Blessing Festival in Bulgaria. However, I think she must have been referring to the Anastenaria, a firewalking ritual performed primarily in May with a smaller one on an unspecified date in January, which culminates in a water blessing after the fire walking.

If you wish to celebrate today as a day of Water Blessings, here’s what you can do:

  • Themes: Joy; Health; Cleansing
  • Symbols: Water; Flowers; Fern; Birchwood
  • Presiding Goddess: Kupala
About Kupala.

The Slavic goddess of springs and water, Kupala, whose name literally means “to bathe,” washes us with happiness and longevity. Oddly enough, she has a fire aspect too, which likely alludes to purification, protection, and transformation. Wildflowers, birch trees, and ferns are sacred to her.

To do today:

To bring a year filled with joy, contentment, and health, leave a natural-fiber cloth outside today to gather dew. Use it tomorrow to bathe in Kupala’s magic.

Take some flower petals to any moving water source (even a hose) and toss them on the stream. As you do, make a wish for something that will make you really happy. Let Kupala, in the form of the water, carry your wish toward manifestation.

To rid yourself of sickness, negativity, or a bad habit before the year gets really rolling, find a safe fire source (such as a candle that’s self-contained in glass). Put this on the floor and jump over it. As you do, say:

Old burns away; only the good, the good shall stay.
Old to new, old to new, Kupala, my heart renew.

This symbolically leaves the old behind and invokes Kupala’s aid in your efforts for positive change.

Source:  365 Goddess

National Popcorn Day is celebrated at the end of January, although its exact date is a matter of debate. Various sources report it as January 19; others claim it takes place on whatever day the “big game” falls on.

Why not use this day for some popcorn magick?

Then he thought if he had some milk, he would have popcorn and milk.

You can fill a glass full to the brim with milk, and fill another glass of the same size brim full of popcorn, and then you can put all the popcorn kernel by kernel into the milk, and the milk will not run over.

~from Farmer Boy by Laura Ingalls Wilder 

Magickal Associations of Corn:
  • Gender: Feminine
  • Planet: Venus, Pluto
  • Element: Earth
  • Season: Lammas and Mabon
  • Deities: agriculture and solar deities
  • Correspondences: Protection, Luck, Divination, Blessing, Offering, Fertility, Abundance
Popcorn Offerings

I’m not sure if you are aware of it, but nature spirits like popcorn. I have it on authority from Chickadee who has had complex relationship with a number of nature spirits, that they almost all like popcorn, particularly the sea gull spirits. This is a great way to introduce children to the idea of a relationship with the land…however, because of the (practical) negative implications of feeding wildlife, it is important to not leave food out too much or too often and to change the area where offerings are left, so that wildlife do not become accustomed to it.

Popcorn Chains

At Yule, when we decorate our tree, we include a popcorn garland. Part of our tradition when we make it is to use what we add to say a thank you and a blessing for someone we love (not for every single piece, but for our “family strand” of garland that that goes on the top of the tree).

Stringing magic popcorn into edible jewelry is an easy way to add a bit of extra love or joy or healing blessings for the kids, and it even makes a great sibling or parent gift. A few months ago, when my daughter did something especially naughty, got it in her head to make a “sorry necklace” for her brother. After eating caramel popcorn on a string, he was in a better mood to forgive her…

Popcorn Fortune Balls

This should be pretty obvious–think fortune cookie in a popcorn ball. Or, if you are packing a lunch for a trip or a day at school, put in an encouraging note or positive thought. Put a popcorn fortune ball on the end of a straw, and add some pipe-cleaner petals for a edible bouquet gift from the kids. All you need are some small strips of paper with a message written on them, and a popcorn ball recipe–stuff the message in the center of the ball as you shape it.

Venus Popcorn Spell

Sharing a bowl of popcorn with someone you love is one of life’s simple pleasures. Adding a sprinkle of practical magic may be akin to “gild-ing the lily,” but who doesn’t like to stir up a little love magic now and then? Rent a favorite romantic movie tonight. Pop some fresh popcorn, add butter if desired, and season with love herbs and passionate spices as suggested below. Say as you do so: “Venus, bless us with love and beauty.”

  • Garlic salt, chili powder, and red pepper-to rekindle your love life.
  • Parmesan cheese and dried basil-for Italian style romance
  • Chili powder, garlic, and basil-fiery passion.
  • A touch of cinnamon, sugar, and vanilla powder-for comfort and warmth.
More Popcorn Day Activities
  • Guess the Amount: Fill a container with popcorn kernels and have everyone guess. The winner gets a nifty prize.
  • Popcorn Air Hockey: Can you “volley” the kernel back and forth 20 times without letting it fall? For this you will need: a flat surface (table), straw (to blow), coffee stirrers (as paddles) or hands (as paddles).
  • Popcorn Relay Race: Holding popped corn in a spoon, run relay races to see which team can keep the popped corn in the spoon longest without spilling it.
  • Popcorn Basketball: Can you flick a piece of popcorn into the basket? Muffin tins or small cups can be used for the basket.
  • Make a Popcorn Word Search: Use these words: popcorn, pop, kernel, explode, heat, moisture, grain, snack, crunchy, butter, oil, salt, fiber, bag, hull.
  • Write a Popcorn Haiku (5, 7, 5 syllable pattern poem): Like this!

Oil, kernels, heat, time
Many loud explosions heard
Pop, crunch, snack time. Yum!

  • How many words can you make from this phrase?
    “Fresh hot popcorn”, “Popcorn tastes good”, “I like popcorn”, “Hot buttered popcorn”

About Popcorn:

Popcorn has been around for 5,000 years. Archaeologists and researchers believe it to be the oldest of a group of five sweet corns. Popcorn originated in Mexico but quickly spread globally. Popcorn ears over 5,600 years old were found in New Mexico in 1948 and 1950, they are the oldest ears of popcorn known.

Popcorn was integral to early 16th century Aztec Indian ceremonies. Bernardino de Sahagun writes:

“And also a number of young women danced, having so vowed, a popcorn dance. As thick as tassels of maize were their popcorn garlands. And these they placed upon (the girls’) heads.”

In 1519, Cortes got his first sight of popcorn when he invaded Mexico and came into contact with the Aztecs. Popcorn was an important food for the Aztec Indians, who also used popcorn as decoration for ceremonial headdresses, necklaces and ornaments on statues of their gods, including Tlaloc, the god of rain and fertility.

An early Spanish account of a ceremony honoring the Aztec gods who watched over fishermen reads:

“They scattered before him parched corn, called momochitl, a kind of corn which bursts when parched and discloses its contents and makes itself look like a very white flower; they said these were hailstones given to the god of water.”

Writing of Peruvian Indians in 1650, the Spaniard Cobo says, “They toast a certain kind of corn until it bursts. They call it pisancalla, and they use it as a confection.”

In South America, kernels of popcorn found in burial grounds in the coastal deserts of North Chile were so well preserved they would still pop even though they were 1,000 years old.

Some Popcorn Trivia:
  • Popcorn is a subspecies of corn called Zea mays everta, and like all corn, it is part of the grass family
  • An 8 foot in diameter popcorn ball, weighing 3,415 lbs, created in 2006 in Lake Forest, IL is the largest popcorn ball on record
  • A popcorn kernel needs 14% moisture content to pop
  • The oldest popcorn popper was discovered in Peru dating back to 300 AD
  • October is National Popcorn Popping Month!
  • After bread, popcorn is one of the most popular foods that people feed waterfowl. Unfortunately, feeding waterfowl isn’t a good idea…
  • Popcorn is the official state snack food of the state of Illinois
  • Archaeological evidence of popcorn dates back to 4700 BC in Peru
  • During the Great Depression, popcorn became exceedingly popular due to its relatively low price and was one of a few businesses that did well.

The Science of Popping Corn:

Popcorn works because each individual kernel (thanks to the hard shell) becomes its own pressure cooker, which then explodes, turning itself inside out. Inside the shell is a starchy substance and water. As the kernel heats up, the water turns into steam and the steam cooks the starch into a super hot jelly-like substance that explodes. After exploding, the water evaporates and the starch dries out, leaving the kernel flipped inside out, in the shape we know as popcorn.

Sources:

Ethiopia follows the Ethiopian calendar, consequently Christmas falls on January 7th and Epiphany on January 19th.  Timkat, Ethiopia’s Epiphany celebration, is a celebration of the baptism of Jesus in the Jordan River. The festival lasts for three days and is at its most colorful in the capital, Addis Ababa, where everyone gets involved in the celebrations.

As part of the celebration, a ritual baptism is done. A stream or pool is blessed before dawn. The water is sprinkled on some participants, while other immerse themselves in the water to symbolically renew their baptismal vows.

Pilgrims come from far and wide to take part in the festival and witness the re-enactment of the baptism. All over the country large crowds assemble as the religious festivities commence, with spectacular processions, song, dance and prayer.

In Addis Ababa, the festival is particularly spectacular. The streets are adorned with green, red and yellow to represent the Ethiopian flag and priests walk through the streets holding colorful and richly decorated umbrellas.

The religious ceremony commences on the first day when the Tabot, a model of the Ark of the Covenant, which is present on every Ethiopian altar (somewhat like the Western altar stone), is reverently wrapped in rich cloth and borne in procession on the head of the priest.

The Tabots are then carried to the river in a procession led by the most senior priest of each church, who carry the arks on top of their heads. The Divine Liturgy is celebrated near a stream or pool early in the morning (around 2 a.m.). Then the nearby body of water is blessed towards dawn and sprinkled on the participants, some of whom jump in the water to renew their baptismal vows.

The second day of Timkat marks the main celebrations, with Orthodox Ethiopians from every segment of society merrily march through the streets in a riot of color, singing, dancing and feasting. All but one of the Tabots are returned to their respective churches.

On the third day of Timkat, known as the feast of St. Michael the Archangel, the Tabot of St. Michael’s Church  is escorted back to its church in colorful procession and festivities.

About the Tabot

The Tabot symbolizes the Ark of the Covenant and the tablets describing the Ten Commandments, which God gave to Moses on Mount Sinai to serve as the core principles of the moral behavior for humanity. The Tabot, which is otherwise rarely seen by the laity, represents the manifestation of Jesus as the Messiah when he came to the Jordan for baptism.

The original Ark of the Covenant is said to be under permanent guard in Northern Ethiopia, protected by priests who have sworn never to leave the sacred grounds.

Sources:

January 21 is the Eve of St Agnes. There are many traditions associated with both this night and tomorrow night, all intended to bring dreams of the future husband. Here are some of them.

  • Walking thrice backwards around a churchyard in silence at midnight, scattering hemp seed over the left shoulder.
  • Boiling an egg, removing the yolk and filling the center with salt and then eating the whole, shell included!
  • Sticking 9 pins into a red onion, taking it backwards to the bedroom and sleeping with it under the pillow.

But the most often repeated one is that of making a Dumb Cake. Here are the instructions:

Three, five or seven maidens should gather together on St Agnes Eve and make a cake from flour, salt, eggs and water. While they are mixing and baking the cake all the girls should stand on something different and which they have never stood on before. Each girl should take a hand in adding each of the ingredients and each girl should turn the cake once. When the cake is baked they should eat it all between them. Then, walking backwards, they should all retire to bed where they will dream of their future husbands. The whole process from start to finish should take place in complete silence and should be completed just before midnight.

It is interesting that all these methods include the elements of silence, walking backward, and retiring to bed at midnight.

Here are some more old old spells for St Agnes night:

On Saint Agnes’ night, take a row of pins and pull out every one, one after another, saying a Pater Noster, sticking a pin in your sleeve, and you will dream of him or her you will marry. “Knit tne left garter about the right-legg’d stocking” (let the other garter and stocking alone), and as you rehearse these following verses, at every comma knit a knot:

“This knot I knit,
To know the thing I know not yet,
That I may see
The man that shall my husband be,
How he goes and what he wears.
And what he does all the days.”

Accordingly in your dream you will see him, if a musician, with a lute or other instrument; if a scholar, with a book,” and so on.

Another dream-charm for St . Agnes’ Eve was to take a sprig of rosemary and another of thyme and sprinkle them thrice with water, then place one in each shoe, and stand shoe and sprig on either side of the bed, repeating:

“St Agnes, that’s to lovers kind.
Come ease the trouble of my mind.”

In many places the notion prevailed that to insure the perfection of these charms the day must be spent in fasting. It was called “St . Agnes’ fast.”

Keat’s beautiful lines commemorative of the day seem doubly exquisite when read after conning the clumsy folk-rhymes:

They told me how upon St. Agnes’ Eve
Young virgins might have visions of delight,
And soft adorings from their loves receive
Upon the hony’d middle of the night.

IF ceremonies due they did aright;
As supperless to bed they must retire
And couch supine their beauties lily white;
Nor look behind, nor sideways, but require
Of heaven with upward eyes for all that they desire.

In Scotland the lasses sow grain at midnight on St . Agnes Eve, singing,—

“Agnes sweet and Agnes fair
Hither, hither now repair.
Bonny Agnes, let me see
The lad who is to marry me.”

And the figure of the future sweetheart appears as if reaping the grain.

Here is yet another one:

A key is placed in the Bible at the second chapter of Solomon’s Song, verses 1, 5 and 17, and the book tied firmly together, with the handle of the key left beyond the edges of the leaves. The tips of the little finger of the charm-tester and of a friend are placed under the side of the key, and then they “tried the alphabet” with the verses above named; that is, they began thus:

A. My beloved is mine, and I am his. He feedeth among the lilies. Until the day break and the shadows fall away, turn, my beloved,” etc.

At the word “turn” the Bible was supposed to turn around if A were the first letter of the lover’s name. Thus could the entire name be spellled out.

Found in

According to astrological and lunar lore, there are best days for doing a variety of tasks. The best days listed here are based on both the phase of the moon and its position in the zodiac. Many people believe that if you do the tasks on the dates listed, you will get the best results possible.

January 1:

  • Can Fruits and Vegetables
  • Make Jams and Jellies
  • Mow Grass (to slow growth)
  • Plant Root Crops
  • Plant Seed Beds
  • Prune Trees
  • Transplant (seedlings and plants) 

January 2:

  • Advertise Something for Sale
  • Castrate Farm Animals
  • Cut Hair (to slow growth)
  • Demolition
  • Harvest
  • Kill Plant Pests
  • Pick Apples and Pears
  • Potty Train a Child
  • Quit Smoking
  • Start Diet (to lose weight)
  • Wash Windows
  • Wash Wooden Floors
  • Wean a Baby or an Animal

January 3:

  • Advertise Something for Sale
  • Castrate Farm Animals
  • Cut Hair (to slow growth)
  • Demolition
  • Harvest
  • Kill Plant Pests
  • Pick Apples and Pears
  • Potty Train a Child
  • Quit Smoking
  • Start Diet (to lose weight)
  • Wash Windows
  • Wash Wooden Floors
  • Wean a Baby or an Animal

January 4:

  • Castrate Farm Animals
  • Mow Grass (to slow growth) 
  • Plant Root Crops
  • Potty Train a Child
  • Prune Trees
  • Wean a Baby or an Animal

January 5:

  • Bake
  • Castrate Farm Animals
  • Cut Firewood
  • Cut Hair (to increase growth)
  • Dig Holes
  • Mow Grass (to increase growth)
  • Plant Above Ground Crops
  • Potty Train a Child
  • Wax Floors
  • Wean a Baby or an Animal

January 6:

  • Bake
  • Castrate Farm Animals
  • Cut Firewood
  • Cut Hair (to increase growth)
  • Dig Holes
  • Mow Grass (to increase growth)
  • Plant Above Ground Crops
  • Potty Train a Child
  • Wax Floors
  • Wean a Baby or an Animal

January 7:

  • Castrate Farm Animals
  • Cut Firewood
  • Dig Holes
  • Kill Plant Pests
  • Mow Grass (to increase growth)
  • Paint
  • Wean a Baby or an Animal

January 8:

  • Castrate Farm Animals
  • Cut Firewood
  • Dig Holes
  • Kill Plant Pests
  • Mow Grass (to increase growth)
  • Paint
  • Potty Train a Child
  • Wean a Baby or an Animal

January 9:

  • Castrate Farm Animals
  • Cut Firewood
  • Cut Hair (to increase growth)
  • Dig Holes
  • Get Married
  • Mow Grass (to increase growth)
  • Plant Above Ground Crops
  • Potty Train a Child
  • Start Diet ((to gain weight))
  • Wax Floors
  • Wean a Baby or an Animal

January 10:

  • Castrate Farm Animals
  • Cut Firewood
  • Cut Hair (to increase growth)
  • Dig Holes
  • Get Married
  • Mow Grass (to increase growth)
  • Plant Above Ground Crops
  • Potty Train a Child
  • Start Diet (to gain weight)
  • Wax Floors
  • Wean a Baby or an Animal

January 11:

  • Castrate Farm Animals
  • Cut Firewood
  • Cut Hair (to increase growth)
  • Dig Holes
  • Get Married
  • Mow Grass (to increase growth)
  • Plant Above Ground Crops
  • Potty Train a Child
  • Start Diet (to gain weight)
  • Wax Floors
  • Wean a Baby or an Animal

January 12:

  • Bake
  • Cut Firewood
  • Dig Holes
  • Kill Plant Pests
  • Mow Grass (to increase growth)

January 13:

  • Bake
  • Cut Firewood
  • Dig Holes
  • Kill Plant Pests
  • Mow Grass (to increase growth)

January 14:

  • Advertise Something for Sale
  • Get Married
  • Cut Firewood
  • Cut Hair (to increase growth)
  • Dig Holes
  • Mow Grass (to increase growth)
  • Paint
  • Plant Above Ground Crops
  • Wax Floors,

January 15:

  • Advertise Something for Sale
  • Cut Firewood
  • Cut Hair (to increase growth)
  • Dig Holes,
  • Get Married
  • Mow Grass (to increase growth)
  • Paint
  • Plant Above Ground Crops
  • Wax Floors

January 16:

  • Cut Firewood
  • Dig Holes
  • Kill Plant Pests
  • Mow Grass (to increase growth)
  • Set Eggs
  • Travel (for pleasure)

January 17:

  • Cut Firewood
  • Dig Holes
  • Kill Plant Pests
  • Mow Grass (to increase growth)
  • Set Eggs
  • Travel (for pleasure)

January 18:

  • Bake
  • Cut Firewood
  • Cut Hair (to increase growth)
  • Dig Holes,
  • Get Married
  • Mow Grass (to increase growth)
  • Plant Above Ground Crops
  • Plant Flowers
  • Plant Seed Beds
  • Set Eggs
  • Start Diet (to gain weight)
  • Wax Floors,

January 19:

  • Bake
  • Cut Firewood
  • Cut Hair (to increase growth)
  • Dig Holes
  • Get Married
  • Mow Grass (to increase growth)
  • Plant Above Ground Crops
  • Plant Flowers
  • Plant Seed Beds
  • Start Diet (to gain weight)
  • Wax Floors

January 20:

  • Cut Firewood
  • Dig Holes
  • Get Married
  • Kill Plant Pests
  • Mow Grass (to increase growth)
  • Paint
  • Travel (for pleasure)

January 21:

  • Ask For a Loan
  • Cut Hair (to slow growth)
  • Demolition
  • Dig Holes
  • Dig Post Holes
  • Dry Fruits and Vegetables
  • Kill Plant Pests
  • Mow Grass (to slow growth)
  • Paint
  • Pick Apples and Pears
  • Quit Smoking
  • Start Diet (to lose weight)
  • Wash Wooden Floors

January 22:

  • Kill Plant Pests
  • Mow Grass (to slow growth)
  • Quit Smoking
  • Slaughter
  • Start Diet (to lose weight)

January 23:

  • Kill Plant Pests
  • Mow Grass (to slow growth)
  • Quit Smoking
  • Slaughter
  • Start Diet (to lose weight)

January 24:

  • Cut Hair (to slow growth)
  • Mow Grass (to slow growth)
  • Plant Flowers
  • Plant Root Crops

January 25:

  • Cut Hair (to slow growth)
  • Mow Grass (to slow growth)
  • Plant Flowers
  • Plant Root Crops

January 26:

  • Cut Hair (to slow growth)
  • Mow Grass (to slow growth)
  • Plant Flowers
  • Plant Root Crops
  • Set Eggs

January 27:

  • Can Fruits and Vegetables
  • Jams and Jellies
  • Mow Grass (to slow growth)
  • Prune Trees
  • Plant Root Crops
  • Plant Seed Beds
  • Set Eggs
  • Transplant (seedlings and plants)

January 28:

  • Can Fruits and Vegetables
  • Jams and Jellies
  • Mow Grass (to slow growth)
  • Plant Root Crops
  • Plant Seed Beds
  • Prune Trees
  • Transplant (seedlings and plants)

January 29:

  • Advertise Something for Sale
  • Castrate Farm Animals
  • Cut Hair (to slow growth)
  • Demolition,
  • Harvest
  • Kill Plant Pests
  • Mow Grass (to slow growth)
  • Pick Apples and Pears
  • Potty Train a Child
  • Quit Smoking
  • Start Diet (to lose weight)
  • Wash Windows
  • Wash Wooden Floors
  • Wean a Baby or an Animal

January 30:

  • Advertise Something for Sale
  • Castrate Farm Animals
  • Cut Hair (to slow growth)
  • Demolition
  • Harvest
  • Kill Plant Pests
  • Mow Grass (to slow growth)
  • Pick Apples and Pears
  • Potty Train a Child
  • Quit Smoking
  • Start Diet (to lose weight)
  • Wash Windows
  • Wash Wooden Floors
  • Wean a Baby or an Animal

January 31:

  • Castrate Farm Animals
  • Mow Grass (to slow growth)
  • Plant Root Crops
  • Potty Train a Child
  • Prune Trees
  • Wean a Baby or an Animal

Source: The Farmer’s Almanac

The best days listed here are based on both the phase of the moon and its position in the zodiac. Many people believe that if you do the tasks on the dates listed, you will get the best results possible.

January

  • Cut Firewood: 5 – 20
  • Dig Holes: 5 – 20
  • Dig Post Holes: 21
  • Mow To Increase Growth: 5 – 20
  • Mow To Slow Growth: 1, 4, 21 – 31

February

  • Cut Firewood: 4 – 18
  • Dig Holes: 4 – 18
  • Dig Post Holes: 3
  • Mow To Increase Growth: 4 – 18
  • Mow To Slow Growth: 1 – 3, 19 – 28

March

  • Cut Firewood: 6 – 19
  • Dig Holes: 6 – 19
  • Dig Post Holes: 2 – 4, 29
  • Mow To Increase Growth: 6 – 19
  • Mow To Slow Growth: 1 – 5, 20 – 31

April

  • Cut Firewood: 5 – 18
  • Dig Holes: 5 – 18
  • Dig Post Holes: 26, 27
  • Mow To Increase Growth: 5 – 18
  • Mow To Slow Growth: 1 – 4, 19 – 30

May

  • Cut Firewood: 4 – 17
  • Dig Holes: 4 – 17
  • Dig Post Holes: 3, 23 – 25, 31
  • Mow To Increase Growth: 4 – 17
  • Mow To Slow Growth: 1 – 3, 18 – 31

June

  • Cut Firewood: 3 – 16
  • Dig Holes: 3 – 16
  • Dig Post Holes: 1, 19 – 21, 27, 28
  • Mow To Increase Growth: 3 – 16
  • Mow To Slow Growth: 1, 2, 17 – 30

July

  • Cut Firewood: 2 – 15, 31
  • Dig Holes: 2 – 15, 31
  • Dig Post Holes: 17, 18, 24 – 26
  • Mow To Increase Growth: 2 – 15, 3
  • Mow To Slow Growth: 1, 16 – 30

August

  • Cut Firewood: 1– 14, 30, 31
  • Dig Holes: 1– 14, 30, 31
  • Dig Post Holes: 21, 22, 27, 28
  • Mow To Increase Growth: 1– 14, 30, 31
  • Mow To Slow Growth: 15– 29

September

  • Cut Firewood: 1– 13, 28 – 30
  • Dig Holes: 1– 13, 28 – 30
  • Dig Post Holes: 14, 15, 21, 22
  • Mow To Increase Growth: 1– 13, 28 – 30
  • Mow To Slow Growth: 14 – 27

October

  • Cut Firewood: 1 – 12, 27 – 31
  • Dig Holes: 1 – 12, 27 – 31
  • Dig Post Holes: 14, 15, 21, 22
  • Mow To Increase Growth: 1 – 12, 27 – 31
  • Mow To Slow Growth: 13 – 26

November

  • Cut Firewood: 1 – 11, 26 – 30
  • Dig Holes: 1 – 11, 26 – 30
  • Dig Post Holes: 12, 17, 18
  • Mow To Increase Growth: 1 – 11, 26 – 30
  • Mow To Slow Growth: 12 – 25

December

  • Cut Firewood: 1 – 11, 26 – 31
  • Dig Holes: 1 – 11, 26 – 31
  • Dig Post Holes: 14 – 16
  • Mow To Increase Growth: 1 – 11, 26 – 31
  • Mow To Slow Growth: 12 – 25

Source: The Farmer’s Almanac

The best days listed here are based on both the phase of the moon and its position in the zodiac. Many people believe that if you do the tasks on the dates listed, you will get the best results possible.

January

  • Demolition: 2, 3, 21, 29, 30
  • Paint: 7, 8, 14, 15, 20, 21
  • Wash Windows:2, 3, 29, 30
  • Wash Wooden Floors: 2, 3, 21, 29, 30
  • Wax Floors: 5, 6, 9 – 11, 14, 15, 18, 19

February

  • Demolition: 25 – 27
  • Paint: 3, 4, 10 – 12, 17, 18
  • Wash Windows: 25 – 27
  • Wash Wooden Floors: 3, 25 – 27
  • Wax Floors: 5 – 7, 10 – 12, 15, 16

March

  • Demolition: 25, 26
  • Paint: 2– 4, 10, 11, 16, 17, 29 – 31
  • Wash Windows: 25, 26
  • Wash Wooden Floors: 2 – 4, 25, 26, 29 – 31
  • Wax Floors: 6, 10, 11, 14, 15, 18, 19

April

  • Demolition: 3, 4, 21, 22
  • Paint: 6, 7, 13, 14, 26, 27
  • Wash Windows: 21, 22
  • Wash Wooden Floors: 3, 4, 21, 22, 26, 27
  • Wax Floors: 6, 10, 11, 14, 15, 18, 19

May

  • Demolition: 1, 2, 18 – 20, 28 – 30
  • Paint: 3, 4, 10, 11, 23 – 25, 31
  • Wash Windows: 18 – 20
  • Wash Wooden Floors: 1, 2, 18 – 20, 23 – 25, 28 – 30
  • Wax Floors: 4, 8, 9, 12 – 17

June

  • Demolition: 24 – 26
  • Paint: 1, 6, 7, 19 – 21, 27, 28
  • Wash Windows: 15, 16
  • Wash Wooden Floors: 2, 19 – 21, 24 – 26, 29, 30
  • Wax Floors: 4, 5, 8 – 14

July

  • Demolition: 22, 23
  • Paint: 3 – 5, 17, 18, 24 – 26, 31
  • Wash Windows: 12, 13
  • Wash Wooden Floors: 17, 18, 22, 23, 27, 28
  • Wax Floors: 2, 6 – 11, 14, 15

August

  • Demolition: 18 – 20, 27, 28
  • Paint: 1, 13, 14, 21, 22, 27, 28
  • Wash Windows: 8 – 10
  • Wash Wooden Floors: 18 – 20, 23, 24, 27, 28
  • Wax Floors: 2 – 7, 11, 12, 30, 31

September

  • Demolition: 14 – 16, 24, 25
  • Paint: 9 – 11, 17, 18, 24, 25
  • Wash Windows: 4 – 6
  • Wash Wooden Floors: 14 – 16, 19 – 21, 24, 25
  • Wax Floors: 1 – 3, 7, 8, 12, 13, 28 – 30

October

  • Demolition: 13, 21, 22
  • Paint: 6 – 8, 14, 15, 21, 22
  • Wash Windows: 2, 3, 29, 30
  • Wash Wooden Floors: 13, 16 – 18, 21, 22
  • Wax Floors: 1, 4, 5, 9 – 11, 27, 28, 31

November

  • Demolition: 17, 18
  • Paint: 3, 4, 10 – 12, 17, 18, 30
  • Wash Windows: 26, 27
  • Wash Wooden Floors: 13, 14, 17, 18
  • Wax Floors: 1, 2, 5 – 7, 10, 11, 28, 29

December

  • Demolition: 14 – 16, 23, 24
  • Paint: 1, 2, 8, 9, 14 – 16, 28, 29
  • Wash Windows: 23, 24
  • Wash Wooden Floors: 14 – 16, 23, 24
  • Wax Floors: 3, 4, 8, 9, 26, 27, 30, 31

Source: The Farmer’s Almanac

1 2 3 46

Subscribe

If you'd like to stay up to date on everything that is posted here, subscribe via email:

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Archives

Moon Tracker

Calendar

January 2019
M T W T F S S
« Dec    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  

Bread Crumbs

Christmas


I think it's time to go shopping... maybe even buy some really cool stuff at my online shops!!

Stats