Saint George’s Eve is an extremely potent night for fertility rites. Crusaders encountered Saint George in Semitic West Asia and brought him home to Europe, where he is most famous for killing the dragon. Or did he? And why is he so helpful to women who wish to conceive? Some believe Saint George to be Baal in disguise.

Baal, Semitic weather deity and bane of the biblical prophets, exemplifies male thunder gods who rain down fertility on a parched region. The image of the dragon or great snake is often used to represent menstruation, the monthly heartache of women wishing but failing to conceive.

Women once flocked to a Syrian shrine devoted to Saint George. Its attendant priests developed such a reputation for working miracles of conception that suspicious husbands soon forbade their wives to go, preferring no children at all to the “miracle” children.

There’s no need to discover the ruins of this shrine. St George can assist your quest in the privacy of your own home.

Here’s how:

Hang a new white nightgown from a fruitful tree on Saint George’s Eve. Leave it overnight. Inspect the garment in the morning. If any living creature is found within it, the woman can expect to conceive before next Saint George’s Day.

To activate the spell put the nightgown on immediately. Having sex while wearing it wouldn’t hurt either.

The most common form of life discovered in the nightgown is a bug or worm. Should you discover a snake wrapped up in your clothing, this is a powerful blessing and promise. A variation of the spell from Kurdistan actively seeks the snake’s blessings.

It is as follows:

Lay your nightgown at the foot of a tree or in its branches in an area known to be infested with snakes, the more venomous the better. Leave it overnight. Return to get the clothing the following day. If a snake is sitting on, or is in any way touching your nightgown, you should be pregnant within the year.

Take the clothing (but not the snake!) home, put it on and make love without laundering it first.

Note:

Saint George’s Day is celebrated on 23 April, the traditionally accepted date of Saint George’s death in AD 303. For Eastern Orthodox Churches which use the Julian calendar, 23 April corresponds to 6 May on the Gregorian calendar.

From: The Element Encyclopedia of 5000 Spells

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