Frequently Asked Questions

I have a gagillion questions for God. It’s quite a list.

  • What is my purpose in life?
  • Am I doing what I’m supposed to be doing?
  • Am I supposed to be doing anything in particular?
  • Is the concept of “supposed to be” even a valid one?
  • Do you love me?
  • Am I acceptable?
  • Am I a miserable failure?
  • Who are you anyway?
  • Why am I here?
  • What do you want from me?
  • How do you expect me to know what you want if you don’t tell me anything in plain English?
  • Do you speak English?
  • Who am I really?
  • Why am I having so much trouble doing and/or being … (insert long list here) … ?
  • Can I please have a bunch of money so I can get out of debt?
  • I would very much like for you to call me up on the phone every day so we can have a nice long talk, would you please do that for me?
  • How can I make sure that the answer to the previous question is “yes”?
  • You could give me a big red phone. It could say “hot line to God” on it. Everyday it could ring, and I would answer it. We could be friends, you could help me with stuff, wouldn’t that be fun?
  • Maybe I could even help you with stuff, don’t you think that would be fun?
  • Of course, you probably never need help… (insert big sigh of relief on my part), that’s true, isn’t it? You’re the Master of the Universe, you don’t need any help with anything, do you?
  • Especially not from me, right?
  • Maybe you don’t even know who I am. Do you know me? Have we met before?
  • What is actually true?
  • Are you reading this list of questions right now?
  • Do you think maybe you might answer one of them today?
  • What if I said “please”?

What really happens when you die? I don’t think anyone can know for sure unless they are dead. That being said, this was an interesting interview that I found on YouTube.

Peter Fenwick (born 25 May 1935) is a neuropsychiatrist and neurophysiologist who is known for his pioneering studies of end-of-life phenomena.

In this interview he talks about near-death-experiences (NDE), death-bed-visitors and how we can achieve a good death.

NDE research is at the cutting edge of consciousness research and offers a convincing model for the understanding of what happens when we die. Peter Fenwick describes the different transitional phases of the dying process and highlights the importance of letting go at the end of ones life.

He offers fascinating insights into common phenomena at the end of life, such as premonitions, seeing a light, death-bed-visions and coincidences.

In his opinion everybody should know about death and the dying process, because it is a normal part of living.

  • Interviewer: Jens Rohrbeck
  • Editor: Werner Huemer
  • Director: Mehmet Yesilgöz

Here’s what Osho says in answer to that question:

Food is always a substitute for love. People who don’t love, who somehow miss a life of love, start eating more; it is a love-substitute.

When a child is born, his first love and his first food are the same thing — the mother. So there is a deep association between food and love; in fact food comes first and then love follows. First the child eats the mother, then by and by he becomes aware that the mother is not just food; she loves him too. But of course for that a certain Growth is necessary. The first day the child cannot understand love. He understands the language of food, the natural primitive language of all animals. The child is born with hunger; food is needed immediately. Love will not be needed until long after; it is not so much of an emergency. One can live without love one’s whole life, but one cannot live without food — that’s the trouble.

So the child becomes aware of the association of food and love. By and by he feels too, that whenever the mother is very loving, she gives her breast in a different way. When she is not loving, but angry, sad, she gives the breast very reluctantly, or does not give it at all. So the child becomes aware that whenever the mother is loving, whenever food is available, love is available. Whenever food is not available, the child feels love is not available, and vice versa. This is in the unconscious.

Somewhere you are missing a life of love so you eat more — that’s a substitute. You go on filling yourself with food and leave no space inside. So there is no question of love, because there is no space left. And with food things are simple because food is dead. You can go on eating as much as you want — food cannot say no. If you stop eating, the food cannot say that you are offending it. One remains a master with food.

But in love you are no longer the master. Another being enters into your life, a dependency enters into your life. You are no longer independent, and that’s the fear.

Ego wants to be independent and ego won’t allow you to love; it will only allow you to eat more. If you want to love then the ego has to be dropped.

It is not a question of food; food is simply symptomatic. So I will not say anything about food, about dieting or doing anything. Because that won’t help you, you won’t succeed. You can try a thousand and one ways; that won’t help. Rather, I will say forget about food, go on eating as much as you want.

Start a life of love, fall in love, find somebody who you can love, and immediately you will see you are not eating so much.

Have you watched? — if you are happy you don’t eat too much. If you are sad you eat too much. People think that when they are happy they eat too much, but that is absolute nonsense. A happy person feels so fulfilled that he feels no space inside. An unhappy man goes on throwing food into himself.

So I won’t touch on food at all…and you continue as you are, but find a lover.

Above All,
Don’t Wobble

I don’t know about you guys, but sometimes the way I “plan” “vision” or “think about” life feels exactly like this picture. A large, complicated, amazing, interesting structure built on sand, with sand, not really liveable, not at all practical, mostly make believe, and only ever real in a “virtual” sense. Not even really “my own”.

The photoshopped image above uses a variety of other images, other ideas, other realities, other experiences – which are then carefully spliced together to create something that “looks” real. The person who created this image did NOT go to that beach, gather all that sand together, and actually MAKE that castle. They didn’t even go outside when they made it. And I’ll be that they made it using photographs that THEY didn’t even take. Someone else probably took the picture of the ocean and the sky, and just as someone else probably created that sand castle, someone else also took the picture of it.

And I’m wondering just how much of what’s in my head is ACTUALLY mine? And why are my hopes and dreams, my goals, wants, and desires, in my head and ONLY in my head? Why am I not out immersed in the actual DOING of it? What’s up with that?

What is it, do you think, that takes a cool idea like that sand castle by the beach… and transforms it into the actual reality of say, for example…. this?

Have problems? Need something fixed? Don’t know what to do? Ask any how-to question, and get an immediate answer from The Plumber Dude. How cool is that?

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