Cold and Flu Remedies

Echinacea for Colds and Flu

Echinacea purpurea 'Rubinglow' - Coneflowers - July - Oxfordshire

The root of this daisy-like flower revs up the immune system. According to an analysis by University of Wisconsin researchers, in eight of nine studies evaluating Echinacea for upper-respiratory infections, the herb reduced symptoms and accelerated recovery compared with placebos. “As soon as I feel a cold coming on, I take it–and my cold is mild and brief,” says Duke. Echinacea is available in teas and capsules, though most herbalists prefer tinctures. Liquid Echinacea products may cause temporary, harmless numbing or tingling of the tongue; minor stomach upset is possible with tinctures.

~Michael Castleman, Natural Health

Coffee as a Decongestant in Colds, Flu and Asthma

a-cup-of-hot-coffee-with-coffee-beans

Caffeine opens narrowed bronchial tubes, according to Joe and Teresa Graedon, authors of The People’s Pharmacy. According to a report in the Annals of Epidemiology, the odds of experiencing current asthma symptoms were reduced 29 percent for subjects who drank coffee on a regular basis when compared with non-coffee drinkers.

~Michael Castleman, Natural Health

Slippery Elm for Bronchitis

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Slippery Elm bark is an ingredient in various lung medicines. A valuable remedy for Bronchitis and all diseases of the throat and lungs is compounded as follows:

  • 1 teaspoonful Flax seed
  • 1 oz. Slippery Elm bark
  • 1 oz. Thoroughwort (Boneset)
  • 1 stick Licorice
  • 1 quart water

Simmer slowly for 20 minutes. Strain and add 1 pint of the best vinegar and 1/2 pint of sugar. When cold, bottle. Dose: 1 tablespoonful two or three times a day.

Source: A Modern Herbal
For information about the individual herbs visit: The Encyclopedia of Herbology

Slippery Elm for Cough

green tea cup

A Slippery Elm compound excellent for coughs is made as follows:

  • Cut obliquely one or more ounces of bark into pieces about the thickness of a match
  • Add a pinch of Cayenne flavor with a slice of lemon and sweeten
  • Infuse the whole in a pint of boiling water and let it stand for 25 minutes.

Take this frequently in small doses: for a consumptive patient, about a pint a day is recommended. It is considered one of the best remedies that can be given as it combines both demulcent and stimulating properties. Being mucilaginous, it rolls up the mucous material so troublesome to the patient and passes it down through the intestines.

Source: A Modern Herbal
For information about the individual herbs visit: The Encyclopedia of Herbology

Marsh Mallow Gargle

marshmallow

The flowers of the Marsh Mallow, boiled in oil and water, with a little honey and alum, have proved good as a gargle for sore throats. In France, they form one of the ingredients of the Tisane de quatre fleurs, a pleasant remedy for colds.

Source: A Modern Herbal
For information about the individual herbs visit: The Encyclopedia of Herbology

Herbal Tea For A Cold

chinese-herbal-tea

Ingredients:

  • 1 teaspoon dried Peppermint
  • 1 teaspoon dried Yarrow
  • 1 teaspoon dried Elder Flowers
  • 2 cups boiling water
  • 1 pinch powdered mixed spices (Cinnamon, Ginger, Cloves)
  • 1 teaspoon Lemon juice

Infuse the herbs in the water for at least 5 minutes, then add the remaining ingredients and honey to sweeten if necessary. Take a wine glassful every 2 hours.

This pleasant, soothing mixture will induce a gentle perspiration, thus helping to reduce a fever.

From: The Complete Book of Herbs and Spices
For information about the individual herbs visit: The Encyclopedia of Herbology

 

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