Folk Medicine Remedies and Cures

Tincture of Lemon Balm

This is a great stomach soothing, anti-viral concoction, perfect to take when you feel like you’re coming down with a cold or bug.

To make the tincture:

Add lemon balm leaves to a jar until about three-quarters filled. Pour in 80 proof or higher alcohol (like vodka) until the jar is filled. Cap with a non-metallic lid and store in a cool, dark place for about 4 to 6 weeks, shaking periodically. Strain and store for at least a year.

Adult dose is 1/4 teaspoon (1 ml) at a time, as needed. I usually mix with equal parts honey for better patient compliance.

From: The Nerdy Farm Wife

Sleepy Time Herbal Syrup

To make a sleepy time herbal syrup – place about 3/4 cup lemon balm leaves into a small pot and add enough water to just cover the leaves. Simmer, covered partially, until the liquid is reduced in half. Strain out and compost the leaves.

While still quite warm, measure out about 1/2 cup of the concentrated tea and stir 1/4 cup raw honey into it. Add more honey to taste, if you wish.

You can make larger or smaller batches – keeping a ratio of about 2 parts lemon balm infusion to 1 part honey. Store in the refrigerator for a week or so.

Dose by the spoonful at night to help calm and relax everyone from children to adults. (Keeping in mind that honey should not be given to infants under one year old.)

From: The Nerdy Farm Wife

Claret Cup For A Fever

One bottle of claret, one pint bottle of German Seltzer-water, a small bunch of Lemon Balm, a small bunch of Borage, one orange cut in slices, half a cucumber sliced thick, a liqueur glass of Cognac, and one ounce of bruised sugar candy.

Process:

Place these ingredients in a covered jug well immersed in rough ice, stir all together with a silver spoon, and when the cup has been iced for about an hour, strain or decanter it off free from the herbs, etc.

From: A Modern Herbal

Carmelite Water

The famous Carmelite Water, first made by 17th century Carmelite nuns was used to treat nervous headache and neuralgia. It combined lemon balm with lemon-peel, nutmeg, coriander and angelica root. Here’s a recipe:

Ingredients:

  • 1 ¼ cups vodka
  • 3 tablespoons dried angelica leaves, and stalks
  • 3 tablespoons dried lemon balm leaves
  • 1 tablespoon coriander seeds, bruised
  • 1 nutmeg, cut into strips
  • 2 tablespoons cloves
  • cinnamon sticks

Instructions:

Pour the vodka into a jar. Add the remaining ingredients,cover tightly and shake. Leave in a warm place for three weeks, shaking every day. Strain into a sterilized bottle and store in a cool place. Use within six months.

Found at: Herbal Riot

A Tea For Nursing Mothers

Some mothers find it difficult to either commence milk production or to maintain a high enough level of production while breastfeeding.

Since it is best for the child to be on breast milk for as long as it is feasible, herbs that will help can be invaluable. For this, herbs such as Aniseed, Blessed Thistle, Caraway Seeds, Fennel Seeds, Fenugreek Seeds, Goat’s Rue and Vervain are available, with Goat’s Rue being perhaps the most powerful.

These seeds, which are rich in volatile oils, are also very effective and can be combined to make a very pleasant tea.

Combine the following:

  • 2 parts Caraway seed
  • 1 part part Fennel seed
  • 2 parts Fenugreek seed
  • 1 part Aniseed

Crush two tablespoons of a mixture of the seeds listed above and put them in a cup of cold water. Bring it to simmering point and then remove from the heat. Leave it to stand for 10 minutes, covered to reduce the loss of the volatile oils. Drink a cup of this tea three times a day.

From: The Complete Illustrated Holistic Herbal

Ginseng for Athletic Stamina

Many athletes take ginseng as part of their training. In a study published in Clinical Therapy, Italian researchers gave 50 physical education teachers a placebo or ginseng (with some vitamins and minerals), and then had them run on a treadmill,

Hearts and lungs in the ginseng group worked more efficiently, and those subjects’ stamina increased significantly, Ginseng is safe, but it does have anticoagulant action. so increased bruising is possible.

~Michael Castleman, Natural Health

Coffee for Pain Relief

Anacin and Excedrin claim that their “extra ingredient” provides greater pain relief. What is it? Caffeine. Many reports, including one in the Archives of Internal Medicine, have shown that adding about 65 milligrams of caffeine to aspirin, ibuprofen or acetaminophen increases pain relief by around 40 percent.

Caffeine blocks pain perception, has pain-relieving action, and elevates mood, which also helps minimize pain. Next time you have a headache, wash down your favorite pain pill with coffee or tea for more relief.

~Michael Castleman, Natural Health

Coffee for Athletic Stamina

The caffeine in coffee or tea stimulates not only alertness (and jitters and insomnia), but also athletic performance. Korean researchers at the Institute for Elderly Health in Seoul asked athletes to ride stationary cycles until they felt exhausted–before and after drinking the equivalent of one tall Starbucks coffee. After their java break, they were able to ride significantly longer.

~Michael Castleman, Natural Health

1 2 3 10

Of Interest

Find Us On Facebook

Quotable

"Foolish the doctor who despises knowledge acquired by the ancients." ~Hippocrates

Be Merry


I think it's time to go shopping... maybe even buy some really cool stuff at my online shops!!

Bread Crumbs

Stats