Monthly Archives: June 2017

Ginseng for Athletic Stamina

Many athletes take ginseng as part of their training. In a study published in Clinical Therapy, Italian researchers gave 50 physical education teachers a placebo or ginseng (with some vitamins and minerals), and then had them run on a treadmill,

Hearts and lungs in the ginseng group worked more efficiently, and those subjects’ stamina increased significantly, Ginseng is safe, but it does have anticoagulant action. so increased bruising is possible.

~Michael Castleman, Natural Health

Coffee for Pain Relief

Anacin and Excedrin claim that their “extra ingredient” provides greater pain relief. What is it? Caffeine. Many reports, including one in the Archives of Internal Medicine, have shown that adding about 65 milligrams of caffeine to aspirin, ibuprofen or acetaminophen increases pain relief by around 40 percent.

Caffeine blocks pain perception, has pain-relieving action, and elevates mood, which also helps minimize pain. Next time you have a headache, wash down your favorite pain pill with coffee or tea for more relief.

~Michael Castleman, Natural Health

Coffee for Athletic Stamina

The caffeine in coffee or tea stimulates not only alertness (and jitters and insomnia), but also athletic performance. Korean researchers at the Institute for Elderly Health in Seoul asked athletes to ride stationary cycles until they felt exhausted–before and after drinking the equivalent of one tall Starbucks coffee. After their java break, they were able to ride significantly longer.

~Michael Castleman, Natural Health

Feverfew for Migraine Prevention

British scientists at the University of Exeter analyzed six studies of feverfew, concluding that the herb significantly reduces the frequency of migraine occurrence. “In my experience,” Duke says, “feverfew prevents migraines in about two-thirds of those who use it consistently.”

  • Dosage is generally 50 to 150 mg per day of powdered leaves.

by: Michael Castleman, Natural Health

Tea Tree Oil for Dandruff

As reported in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, Australian researchers studied 126 people with dandruff, which is caused by a skin fungus. Subjects were given either an ordinary shampoo or one containing 5 percent tea tree oil. After four weeks, flaking was reduced 11 percent in the plain-shampoo group, but 41 percent in those who used tea tree oil.

It’s not a miracle cure, but if your dandruff shampoo isn’t working as well as you’d like, add a drop or two of tea tree oil each time you shampoo.

by Michael Castleman, Natural Health

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