Washes and Rinses

Tea Tree Oil for Dandruff

As reported in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, Australian researchers studied 126 people with dandruff, which is caused by a skin fungus. Subjects were given either an ordinary shampoo or one containing 5 percent tea tree oil. After four weeks, flaking was reduced 11 percent in the plain-shampoo group, but 41 percent in those who used tea tree oil.

It’s not a miracle cure, but if your dandruff shampoo isn’t working as well as you’d like, add a drop or two of tea tree oil each time you shampoo.

by Michael Castleman, Natural Health

Fresh and Cool

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This combination of lemon and mint makes a great summer cooling body spray and/or facial toner.

Ingredients:

  • 1 ounce. peppermint leaves (dried), or handful fresh
  • 1/2 cup witch hazel
  • 2 drops lemon essential oil

Pour 1 cup boiling water over the peppermint leaves turn off the heat and steep in a covered container until cool. Strain. Add witch hazel and lemon.

Found at Annie’s Remedy

Elderflower Bath

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Elder Flowers, if placed in the water used for washing the hands and face, will both whiten and soften the skin-a convenient way being to place them in a small muslin bag. Such a bag steeped in the bathwater makes a most refreshing bath and a well known French doctor has stated that he considers it a fine aid in the bath in cases of irritability of the skin and nerves.

From: A Modern Herbal

Elder Flower Water

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Elder Flower Water (Aqua Sambuci) is an official preparation of the British Pharmacopoeia, which directs that it be made from 100 parts of Elder Flowers distilled with 500 parts of water (about 10 lb. to the gallon), and that if fresh Elder flowers are not obtainable, an equivalent quantity of the flowers preserved with common salt be used. The product has at first a distinctly unpleasant odor, but gradually acquires an agreeably aromatic odor, and it is preferable not to use it until this change has taken place.

Elder Flower Water is employed in mixing medicines and chiefly as a vehicle for eye and skin lotions. It is mildly astringent and a gentle stimulant. It is the Eau de Sureau of the Continent, Sureau being the French name of the Elder.

Elderflower Water in our great-grandmothers’ days was a household word for clearing the complexion of freckles and sunburn, and keeping it in a good condition. Every lady’s toilet table possessed a bottle of the liquid, and she relied on this to keep her skin fair and white and free from blemishes, and it has not lost its reputation. Its use after sea-bathing has been recommended, and if any eruption should appear on the face as the effect of salt water, it is a good plan to use a mixture composed of Elder Flower Water with glycerine and borax, and apply it night and morning.

Here is a recipe that can be carried out at home:

Fill a large jar with Elder blossoms, pressing them down, the stalks of course having been removed previously. Pour on them 2 quarts of boiling water and when slightly cooled, add 1 1/2 OZ. of rectified spirits. Cover with a folded cloth, and stand the jar in a warm place for some hours. Then allow it to get quite cold and strain through muslin. Put into bottles and cork securely.

From: A Modern Herbal

A Soothing Wash

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The bark from the most common European elm, Ulnus procera, can be used medicinally. A decoction, made by boiling 1 oz fresh, inner bark in 1 1/4 pints water until reduced by half, is an astringent, soothing wash for wounds, skin problems and for dandruff.

The fresh, bruised leaves can also be used as a healing poultice for wounds or infused and used as a rinse for scurfy skin and dandruff.

From: The Complete Book of Herbs and Spices
For information on individual herbs visit: The Encyclopedia of Herbology

Marsh Mallow Gargle

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The flowers of the Marsh Mallow, boiled in oil and water, with a little honey and alum, have proved good as a gargle for sore throats. In France, they form one of the ingredients of the Tisane de quatre fleurs, a pleasant remedy for colds.

Source: A Modern Herbal
For information about the individual herbs visit: The Encyclopedia of Herbology

Lavender Astringent

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Ingredients:

  • 3 parts Lavender Flowers
  • 1 part powdered Orris
  • Sufficient cider vinegar to cover

Combine the ingredients and leave to stand for at least 2 weeks. Strain through a cloth or a coffee filter and bottle.

Note: Vinegar washes should always be diluted before using directly on the skin; a tablespoon to a wash basin of water should be sufficient.

From: The Complete Book of Herbs and Spices
For information about the individual herbs visit: The Encyclopedia of Herbology

 

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