Cold and Flu Remedies

An Amish Sore Throat Cure

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In old Amish culture, fresh beets were the cure for sore throats.

Grate the beets into a four-inch-wide strip in the middle of a dish towel. Make a pocket by gathering three sides of the towel. Place the towel around your neck with the beet side next to your throat. Pin the towel closed with a safety pin. When the beets turn green, discard them and start again.

Be careful to protect your clothing … beets have also traditionally been used as clothing dye!

Licorice for Sore Throat

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In a study in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, researchers gave either a placebo or Throat Coat, a licorice tea from Traditional Medicinals, to 60 sore-throat sufferers 4 to 6 times a day for seven days; the tea tipplers reported significantly less pain on swallowing. Add a teaspoon of chopped or powdered root to a beverage tea, and feel relief almost immediately.

~Michael Castleman, Natural Health

Ginseng for Immune Enhancement

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Many studies show that ginseng revs up the immune system. Scientists at the University of Milan. Italy, gave ginseng (100 mg a day) or a placebo to 227 people. A month later. everyone received a flu shot (which does not kill the flu virus. but rather stimulates the immune system to resist infection). In the placebo group, 42 people got the flu, but in the ginseng group, the figure was just 15, demonstrating that ginseng enhanced immune response to the shot.

~Michael Castleman, Natural Health

Echinacea for Colds and Flu

Echinacea purpurea 'Rubinglow' - Coneflowers - July - Oxfordshire

The root of this daisy-like flower revs up the immune system. According to an analysis by University of Wisconsin researchers, in eight of nine studies evaluating Echinacea for upper-respiratory infections, the herb reduced symptoms and accelerated recovery compared with placebos. “As soon as I feel a cold coming on, I take it–and my cold is mild and brief,” says Duke. Echinacea is available in teas and capsules, though most herbalists prefer tinctures. Liquid Echinacea products may cause temporary, harmless numbing or tingling of the tongue; minor stomach upset is possible with tinctures.

~Michael Castleman, Natural Health

Coffee as a Decongestant in Colds, Flu and Asthma

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Caffeine opens narrowed bronchial tubes, according to Joe and Teresa Graedon, authors of The People’s Pharmacy. According to a report in the Annals of Epidemiology, the odds of experiencing current asthma symptoms were reduced 29 percent for subjects who drank coffee on a regular basis when compared with non-coffee drinkers.

~Michael Castleman, Natural Health

Slippery Elm for Bronchitis

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Slippery Elm bark is an ingredient in various lung medicines. A valuable remedy for Bronchitis and all diseases of the throat and lungs is compounded as follows:

  • 1 teaspoonful Flax seed
  • 1 oz. Slippery Elm bark
  • 1 oz. Thoroughwort (Boneset)
  • 1 stick Licorice
  • 1 quart water

Simmer slowly for 20 minutes. Strain and add 1 pint of the best vinegar and 1/2 pint of sugar. When cold, bottle. Dose: 1 tablespoonful two or three times a day.

Source: A Modern Herbal
For information about the individual herbs visit: The Encyclopedia of Herbology

Slippery Elm for Cough

green tea cup

A Slippery Elm compound excellent for coughs is made as follows:

  • Cut obliquely one or more ounces of bark into pieces about the thickness of a match
  • Add a pinch of Cayenne flavor with a slice of lemon and sweeten
  • Infuse the whole in a pint of boiling water and let it stand for 25 minutes.

Take this frequently in small doses: for a consumptive patient, about a pint a day is recommended. It is considered one of the best remedies that can be given as it combines both demulcent and stimulating properties. Being mucilaginous, it rolls up the mucous material so troublesome to the patient and passes it down through the intestines.

Source: A Modern Herbal
For information about the individual herbs visit: The Encyclopedia of Herbology

Marsh Mallow Gargle

marshmallow

The flowers of the Marsh Mallow, boiled in oil and water, with a little honey and alum, have proved good as a gargle for sore throats. In France, they form one of the ingredients of the Tisane de quatre fleurs, a pleasant remedy for colds.

Source: A Modern Herbal
For information about the individual herbs visit: The Encyclopedia of Herbology

Marsh Mallow Water

marshmallowroottearecipeMarshmallow water may be used with good effect in all cases of inveterate coughs, catarrhs, etc.

Soak one ounce of marsh mallow roots in a little cold water for half an hour; peel off the bark, or skin; cut up the roots into small shavings, and put them into a jug to stand for a couple of hours; the decoction must be drunk tepid, and may be sweetened with honey or sugar-candy, and flavoured with orange-flower water, or with orange juice.

~Francatelli’s Cook’s Guide
For information about the individual herbs visit: The Encyclopedia of Herbology

Herbal Tea For A Cold

chinese-herbal-tea

Ingredients:

  • 1 teaspoon dried Peppermint
  • 1 teaspoon dried Yarrow
  • 1 teaspoon dried Elder Flowers
  • 2 cups boiling water
  • 1 pinch powdered mixed spices (Cinnamon, Ginger, Cloves)
  • 1 teaspoon Lemon juice

Infuse the herbs in the water for at least 5 minutes, then add the remaining ingredients and honey to sweeten if necessary. Take a wine glassful every 2 hours.

This pleasant, soothing mixture will induce a gentle perspiration, thus helping to reduce a fever.

From: The Complete Book of Herbs and Spices
For information about the individual herbs visit: The Encyclopedia of Herbology

 

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