Soup

Cranberry Soup

  • 1 cup cranberries
  • 2 cups water
  • Honey to taste
  • 1 tbsp potato starch

Heat cranberries and water together until cranberry skins open. Strain and add honey to taste. Bring mixture close to a boil, then remove from heat. In a separate bowl, mix starch with 2 tbsp cold water. Slowly add this mixture to the cranberry juice – stir vigorously.

Return mixture to heat and bring to full boil, stirring until it thickens and becomes slightly transparent. Store in refrigerator in a covered container. Serve w/ warm cream. Soothes colds, and is a good source of vitamins C and B.

Source: Witches of the Craft

Spicy Buckwheat Soup


Ingredients:

  • 8 oz buckwheat noodles
  • 12 oz pork tenderloin
  • 4 cups chicken stock
  • 2 tablespoons salt
  • 2 teaspoons Szechuan peppercorns
  • 3 dried red chili pods
  • ½ teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 1 cup mushrooms
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce

De-seed and julienne chili pods. Boil noodles. Heat oil in a skillet and sear salted/peppered pork on all sides for about 10 minutes. Drain noodles. Heat chicken stock over medium heat, adding noodles, peppers, pepper flakes, mushrooms, and soy sauce. Simmer. Add thinly sliced pork to broth and serve.

Source: Jen Reviews

A Kitchari Fast

In Ayurveda, the ancient wisdom of India dating back 5,000 years, this mix of rice and mung beans is considered extremely easy to digest and is said to purify the digestion and cleanse the body of toxins. Ayurvedic physicians often prescribe a kitchari diet before, during, and after panchakarma, a rejuvenative treatment that cleanses toxins stored in bodily tissues as it restores systemic balance.

Kitchari provides solid nourishment while allowing the body to devote energy to healing. You can safely subsist on kitchari anytime in order to build vitality and strength as it helps balance all three doshas. For restless vata, the warm soup is grounding; for fiery pitta, its spices are calming; and for chilly kapha, it provides healing warmth.

According to Vasant Lad, in his book, The Complete Book of Ayurvedic Home Remedies, “A five-day kitchari fast, using plain kitchari with just some chopped cilantro leaves added, will cleanse the system and help to strengthen memory.”

Kitchari fasting is actually a mono-diet, which means the body receives a limited diversity of foodstuffs and therefore needs to produce a limited number of digestive enzymes. The work of the digestive system is lessened, allowing for greater healing and cleansing to occur. A kitchari cleanse can be calming, soothing and warming.

Kitchari tastes like a cross between a creamy rice cereal and a light dal, or lentil soup. If it is a cold, blustery day or you are feeling under the weather, a steaming bowl of this classic Indian comfort food can both warm up your bones and restore sagging energy. Everyone has his or her own special method of making kitchari. Ayurvedic Cooking for Self Healing offers a half-dozen kitchari recipes, including this one found on Yoga Journal:

Ingredients:
  • 1 cup split yellow mung beans
  • 1 tbsp peeled, chopped fresh ginger
  • 2 tbsp shredded coconut
  • handful chopped cilantro
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp each of cardamom, pepper, clove powder, turmeric, salt
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 3 tbsp ghee or butter
  • 1 cup raw basmati rice
  • 6 cups water
Directions:

First, rinse the mung beans and soak for several hours. Set aside. In a blender, liquefy the peeled, chopped ginger, shredded coconut, chopped cilantro with one-half cup of water. In a large saucepan, lightly brown the spices, salt; and bay leaves (remove before serving) in the ghee, or butter.

Drain the beans and then stir them into the spice mixture in the saucepan. Next, add the basmati rice. Stir in the blended spice and coconut mixture, followed by six cups of water. Bring to a boil, cover, and cook on low heat for approximately 25 to 30 minutes until soft.

Potato Leek Soup

Ingredients:

  • 3 big leaks cleaned and sliced finely (white bits only)
  • A handful of fresh dill or about 3 tbsp dried dill
  • 3-4 huge potatoes peeled and diced
  • 5-6 chicken stock cubes
  • Black pepper
  • A stick of butter

Melt the butter and add leeks till soft. Add potatoes, and rest of ingredients. Add enough water to cover veggies. Bring to a full boil. Boil for 10 minutes. Lower heat and gently simmer for about 30 minutes. Can add a small can of evaporated milk at the end, but it usually is creamy enough without it.

Pumpkin Soup

Ingredients:

  • Pumpkin
  • Onion
  • Salt
  • Oil
  • Water
  • Cinnamon, Nutmeg, and Allspice
  • Croutons or toasted pumpkin seeds to garnish

Cut the pumpkin open and remove seeds and the stringy portion of the interior. Cut the pumpkin into about one inch cubes. Slice the onion and saute for a couple of minutes, then add the pumpkin. Saute for about five minutes, stirring, and then add a cup of water, put on a lid, and let it simmer for forty o fifty minutes, until the pumpkin is quite tender.

At this point the pumpkin, or some portion of it, can be mashed to thicken the broth. Add some more water to the onion / pumpkin mixture to make it soupy. Heat and season with salt, cinnamon, and nutmeg, or any other herbs you might want to use for the seasoning.

The soup may be garnished with croutons, toasted pumpkin seeds, and or sour cream.

  • Note:

This recipe did not include any definitive amounts. I think this is because the sizes of pumpkins used may vary widely. I think you could just follow your own intuition, and season it to taste.

Saute and seasoning variations:

  • equal parts of oil and orange juice
  • two parts oil, one part lemon juice, sugar or honey to taste

From: Tassajara Cooking

Roast Pumpkin with Cream and Parmesan

Ingredients

  • 1½ kg pumpkin
  • 300ml pot double cream
  • 150ml milk
  • 3 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 2 tsp thyme leaves
  • 85g grated parmesan

Method

Heat oven to 150C/130C fan/gas 2.

Cut lid off pumpkin and scoop out seeds and strands. Put the pumpkin on a baking tray. Meanwhile, heat the cream, milk, garlic and most of the thyme, with plenty of seasoning. When hot, pour into the pumpkin and stir in 50g of the Parmesan. Put on the lid.

Bake for 1½ hrs, take from the oven, then turn up the heat to 200C/180C fan/ gas 6. Remove the lid, sprinkle with pepper and the rest of the cheese, then bake for 15 mins more until golden. Scatter over the remaining thyme leaves. Scoop the pumpkin flesh into bowls with the cheesy cream and serve with crusty bread as a starter.

Recipe from BBC Good Food

A Healing Bone Broth

Bone broth is the most accessible “cure-all in traditional households and the magic ingredient in classic gourmet cuisine, stock or broth made from bones of chicken, fish and beef builds strong bones, assuages sore throats, nurtures the sick, puts vigor in the step and sparkle in love life–so say grandmothers, midwives and healers.

For chefs, stock is the magic elixir for making soul-warming soups and matchless sauces. Stock contains minerals in a form the body can absorb easily-not just calcium but also magnesium, phosphorus, silicon, sulphur and trace minerals. It contains the broken down material from cartilage and tendons–stuff like chondroitin sulphates and glucosamine, now sold as expensive supplements for arthritis and joint pain.

It works great as a base for soups, sauces, grains, beans or add some kraut and a bit of miso for a delicious and easy lunch. A warm cup in the morning is a simple and nourishing tonic to begin the day. This is the flavor of love!

Here’s a simple recipe:

Every time you come upon a beef bone, like when you have steak, keep it. Collect leftover bones in a gallon bag in the freezer. Eventually, you’ll have enough for a pot of stock. If you like, you can buy some bones as well, or instead.

You can buy soup bones at a butcher store or your supermarket’s butcher counter. They might be labeled soup bones, marrow bones, or even “dog bones,” although people can eat them, too! If you don’t see them on display, ask the nice folks behind the counter, and they’ll set them aside to sell you when they remove them from the meat they process, or even order them for you.

Ingredients:

  • Beef bones, about 3 quarts, or 3 pounds – you can use any mix of leftover bones or soup bones, marrow bones or bones sold for dogs
  • Water

Equipment that bears mentioning:

  • Tall stock pot (ideal), or any big pot
  • Tongs
  • A big bowl or another big pot
  • Several freezer-safe containers

In a nutshell:

Roast bones until browning and fragrant. Simmer bones 6 to 12 hours. Cool and strain. Lift off tallow when completely cool.

Yield:

About 1 gallon.

Temperature and time:

  • Oven: 350 F : 45 minutes.
  • Stovetop: Low : 6 to 12 hours

In detail:

Heat water. Fill a stockpot or other large pot with water about halfway and set on the stove on high heat. It takes a while for this to get to the boil, so you might as well get it started while the bones are roasting.

Roast bones. Set oven to 350 F. Spread bones out on a shallow baking sheet or rimmed cookie sheet. Place in oven for 45 minutes, or until browned and sizzling. Don’t allow them to burn or get singed, or the whole batch will taste burnt.

Remove the pan of bones from the oven and set it near the pot. Use kitchen tongs to transfer the bones carefully into the water. The bones will be sizzling hot — up to 350 F (think about it) — so don’t drop them in so that they make a splash that could burn you. Slide or place them carefully.

Simmer bones. Add water, if there’s space in the pot, so that there approximately a gallon plus a quart of water. That’ll give you a gallon of stock, after about a quart of loss to evaporation, absorption into the bones and clinging to the bones. The precise amount of water is not important. If you don’t have a pot big enough for this amount of water and/or bone, just use less.

Bring the water to the boil. Turn the heat to the lowest setting possible that will maintain a gentle simmer. The surface of the water should be waving gently and making many tiny bubbles. It should not be frothing crazily.

Over the course of the next several hours, check the soup every hour or so to see that the simmer level is good.

After six to twelve hours, turn off the heat. The amount of time depends on your convenience. You could cook this overnight, but the strong cooking aroma might disturb your sleep, despite being wonderful.

Cool and strain. Let the stock cool. This will take an hour or two. Pour the stock through a strainer into a big bowl or another big pot.

Skim tallow. If desired, cool it long enough that you can easily lift the tallow (beef fat) that has collected and solidified atop the liquid. Store this separately in the refrigerator. It makes an excellent, stable and tasty cooking fat with a high smoke point.

Store stock. Ladle the stock into individual containers and store in refrigerator or freezer.

Variations:

  • Use any other kind of animal bones you like, chicken especially will take less time due to smaller pieces.
  • Add a splash of vinegar when simmering the bones. (The acidity will help extract more minerals from the bones).
  • Add chopped veggies like carrots, celery and onions for more flavor or variety.

A crock pot makes this recipe super-simple, but you can also use a large stock pot (hence the name) or an enameled cast-iron dutch oven type of pot.

Recipe from: How To Cook With Vesna

Cranberry Borscht

borscht-b-640Ingredients:

  • 2 cups cranberries
  • 3 quarts water
  • 2 large onions (sliced)
  • 2 cups finely shredded cabbage
  • 1 one pound can of beets (julienne or sliced accordingly)
  • salt to taste
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • 1/2 pint sour cream
  • 3 hard boiled eggs (sliced)

Cook cranberries in water for about 10 minutes or until skins pop. Put cranberries and liquid through sieve or food mill. Skim the seeds from the top. Add onions and cabbage. Cook for 20 to 30 minutes or until soft. Add beets and beet liquid. Season with salt and honey. Serve hot or well chilled. Garnish with sour cream and slices of hard boiled eggs.

Yield: 8 servings

Source: The Honey Cookbook

Split Pea Soup

split-pea-soup-675x454
Ingredients:

  • 2 cups split peas, boiled in 6 cups water
  • 4 or more cups additional water
  • 1 large onion, minced, 2 cups
  • 2 medium celery stalks, quarter rounds, 1½ cups
  • 2 medium carrots, thin quarter rounds, 1½ cups
  • ½ tsp sea salt
  • 5 tsp soy sauce, optional

Procedure – Boil split peas for 1 hour in 6 cups water until soft. Using the same pot, add the additional water. Mix with beans so water is at the bottom of the pot. Add vegetables. Sprinkle sea salt on top. Cover and bring to a boil. Simmer 30 minutes over low heat, using a heat diffuser if needed. Add soy sauce if used.

Yield: 10 cups

Source: Ohsawa Macrobiotics

Kitchari

Indian Daal

Traditional Indian food for soothing diets. Nutritious and easily digested, Kitchari is simply rice and dahl cooked so thoroughly together that they make a creamy stew. This makes a good soup for an evening supper or a light meal while fasting. Total cooking time about 1 1/2 hours.

Ingredients:

  • 1/4 cup mung lentils, cleaned and washed
  • 1 1/2 cup water
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon Vata Churna
  • 1/4 cup rice
  • 2 tablespoons ghee
  • 1 1/4 cup water
  • 1/4 teaspoon saffron (optional)
  • 1 tablespoon ghee
  • 1 teaspoon cumin
  • 1 teaspoon mustard seeds

Bring water to a boil in a 2 quart pan. Add lentils, salt, and Churna. Cover and bring back to a boil, then reduce heat to ver low and simmer for about an hour.

Add rice, ghee, water, and saffron. Increase heat and bring to boil again. Then reduce to low and simmer for half an hour. Stir frequently to avoid sticking and add more water if it becomes too thick. Khichari should have the consistency of thick gravy. When ready to serve heat ghee in small pan with spices. When mustard seeds start to pop stir spices into Khichari and serve.

Serves 2 or 3

Source: The Ayurveda Cookbook

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