Ice Cream

A Nice Mulberry Sorbet

Sorbets make for a perfect ending to a meal or to eat away when you feel like having something ice-cream like but without the calories.

  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 cup water
  • 5 cups Mulberries
  • 2 tablespoons Port Wine

Instructions:

Clean the Mulberries and set them aside. Boil sugar and water in a container with medium heat. Simmer it for 3 to 4 minutes.

Turn the heat off and let it cool. While the sugar syrup is cooling, pick off all the green stems from the Mulberries.

Blend the Mulberries and pour the sugar syrup on the Mulberry paste. Make it into a puree. Sieve the Mulberry puree to remove any residual seeds or stems.

Pour a bit of Port Wine into it and chill the mixture in the freezer for about an hour. Then, pour it into an ice cream maker and whip up a sorbet.

From: Encyclopedia of Herbology

An Easy Mulberry Sorbet

Beat the summer heat with a cool and scrumptious Mulberry Sorbet. This is an easy recipe which is made with mulberries and honey.

Here’s what you will need:

  • An ice crushing blender or a small food processor
  • 8 oz frozen Mulberries
  • 3 to 4 tablespoons simple syrup as a sweetener (or agave or honey or maple syrup)
  • And just a squeeze of lemon juice or lime juice

You don’t need an ice cream maker for this recipe because you’re making small batches of sorbet. The blender will be crushing the frozen fruit to very small pieces to make it almost as small as with an ice cream maker.

  • Roughly weigh out the frozen fruit and place it in a small food processor or ice crushing blender.
  • Pulse to crush the fruits into small pieces and add the sweetener, a tablespoon at a time (while pulsing) to create a smooth sorbet-like paste.
  • Add a squeeze of lemon juice and run the blender for a few seconds to mix.
  • In addition to the sweeteners, you can add water or orange juice or lemonade IF your blender needs a little extra liquid to make that sorbet!
Spoon it into a bowl and serve immediately – or store in the freezer until you’re ready.

This recipe for sorbet is best eaten immediately – straight after blending.

  • Note: Traditional sorbet has a lot more sugar added to it, to allow the sorbet to be softer in consistency and scoopable even when frozen.

Because this easy fruit sorbet has far less sugar than a traditional sorbet, it will harden more when frozen. But it will be just like sorbet as soon as it’s blended! So it’s perfect as an easy alternative for sorbet and a quick and healthy, refreshing summer snack or treat!

However, you can freeze it for later too. You will have to let the sorbet soften a little at room temperature so that it can be scooped easily.

From: The Flavor Bender

Lilac Ice Cream

Fragrant and sweet. Who can resist this? Here’s what you will need:

  • about 100 lilac florets
  • 150ml milk
  • 25g sugar
  • pinch of salt
  • 2 egg yolks
  • 200ml heavy cream

Pick the florets off a bloom of lilac and rinse them. Warm the milk, sugar, salt and lilac florets in a small, heavy saucepan over a medium heat, stirring to dissolve. Remove from the heat when the milk is starting to steam and before it actually starts to simmer.

Taste at this point to check the level of lilac flavor, remembering that the flavor will dissipate somewhat with the addition of the other ingredients. For a stronger flavor, leave the mixture to infuse and taste periodically.

When ready, strain off the lilac florets and warm (but don’t simmer) the mixture again.

Break the egg yolks into a small bowl and stir them together. Gradually add some of the warmed milk to the yolks, stirring constantly, then add the warmed yolk and milk mixture back into the saucepan with the rest of the milk.

Cook the egg and milk mixture (or we can call it custard now) over a low heat, stirring frequently, until it’s thick enough to coat your spoon or spatula (this took me around 12 minutes or so). Now pour the custard mixture into the cream, stirring to combine.

Chill the mixture by sitting it in an ice bath and then freeze either using an ice cream maker, if you’ve got one, or as follows, if you don’t:

Put the mixture in a deep baking dish or bowl and place in the freezer. After about 45 minutes, once the mixture has started to freeze around the edges, remove the bowl and beat the mixture vigorously, using a whisk or a hand blender to break up any ice crystals that have started forming.

Return the mixture to the freezer and repeat this roughly every 30 minutes until the ice cream is frozen which, depending on your freezer, may take take 3-6 hours.

Instead of using sugar, it might be even more fun to sweeten the ice cream with Lilac Honey.

From: The Daily Spud

Wild Rose Blossom Ice Cream

Any fragrant edible blossom will do, so long as it is abundant.

  • 100 ml full fat milk
  • 200 ml double cream
  • 4 cups wild rose blossoms
  • 1 tsp vanilla essence
  • 2 egg yolks
  • 30 grams caster sugar

Pour the milk and cream into a saucepan with the blossoms and vanilla essence. Heat the mixture until it begins to simmer. Remove, put to one side and let steep for 30 minutes. Strain out the blossoms.

Whisk the egg yolks with the sugar until creamy. Then gently pour the cream mixture onto the yolks, whisking all the while. Return the mixture to the saucepan and heat for a minute or two to thicken.

Pour into an ice-cream machine, if you have one, and churn. Otherwise, pour the ice cream into a bowl and freeze. Stir often until it resembles ice cream.

From: Foraging by John Lewis-Stempel

 

Elderberry Ice cream


Ingredients:

  • Elderberries (destalked)
  • Sugar
  • Juice of 1/2 a lemon
  • 1/2 pint Double cream
  • 2 Egg whites

First pick your elderberries. The easiest way is to snip off whole bunches, and then strip the individual berries off using the prongs of a fork at your leisure. I picked about half a carrier bag of bunches, which came out to a big saucepan of berries.

Put the berries into a saucepan with a little water, a sprinkling of sugar and the juice of half a lemon. Go steady on the sugar, you can always add more later if you need to.

With a lid on the saucepan, gently simmer for about 45 minutes, or until the berries have gone very soft. Leave to cool, and then push the berries through a sieve, discarding the pips that remain. This will leave a rich elderberry syrup. Taste it, and add more sugar if required. As a guide I had about a pint of syrup at the end.

Whip half a pint of double cream until it stands in peaks, and in a separate bowl whisk two eggwhites until they are stiff enough to tip the bowl upside down. This can be quite a feat with a hand whisk!

Fold the cream, egg whites and elderberry syrup together gently, until the whole mixture is a uniform lurid purple. Pour into a suitable freezer container – I used a Pyrex glass bowl. Then stick it into your freezer.

By John Kennett

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