Beautiful

Beautiful Beaches That Glow In The Dark

Greek philosopher Anaximenes is thought to have made the first report of marine bioluminescence. This was back in circa 500 C.E., when he saw an inexplicable glow as his oar cut through the water at night. Modern scientific explanations describe the phenomenon as a type of chemiluminescence born when light-releasing luciferin generated by organisms interreacts with oxygen. In most, if not all, cases this reaction is accelerated by the presence of a luciferase enzyme.

Marine creatures, insects, algae, bacteria and fungi all produce the magical glow that is bioluminescence; and different species do so for different reasons – including disguise, communication, for lighting and as lure. Bacteria and fungi usually shine constantly during phases of bioluminescence, while algae and marine animals give off intermittent light. One of the most widely observed forms of the phenomenon is caused by dinoflagellates, a type of phytoplankton.

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