Amazing Photography

Strange Faces

Italian photographer Elido Turco spent four years between 2004 and 2008 exploring a mirrored photography world that remains invisible to most of us. By taking photographs of tree bark and then mirroring the photographs he captured, he discovered a whole society of “Dream Creatures” were watching him each time he would take a stroll through the mountain paths.

Turco loves walking the mountain paths of his native Friuli with his wife, and for years he would use this time to try and find human forms and faces formed by the bark and roots of the trees in the forest.

The catches, he admits, were few and far between until, one day, curiosity got the best of him and he decided to mirror an image on his computer. What he discovered was “a world of… fantastic creatures” the he had never realized existed.

To see more of these Dream Creatures, head over to Turco’s Flickr set by the same name. And if you’d like to browse through the rest of his work, check out his Flickr and 500px accounts.

Jackals vs Vultures

Jackals and Vultures survive on carrion, and sometimes come into savage competition for a meal. Sharp talons and ferocious beaks versus strong jaws and pointy teeth, the battles can be vicious, violent confrontations.

The carcass was put out for the vultures so that visitors to the Giants Castle Nature Reserve could view them closer, but the vultures were far too late by the time they arrived as the jackals had already claimed it. And it looks like the Jackals won this round.

Not all the fighting looks this simple and tidy. More often, a huge crowd shows up to claim the carrion, and it’s loud, rowdy, and dusty, as you can see from the following photos.

When it’s one on one, the Jackal and Vulture seem to be evenly matched in size, savagery, and vicious determination.

But, with vultures, there’s never just the one!

Sometimes, even with reinforcements, the Vultures win the meal.

But there are days when a Jackal gets the upper hand.

 

Beautiful Beaches That Glow In The Dark

Greek philosopher Anaximenes is thought to have made the first report of marine bioluminescence. This was back in circa 500 C.E., when he saw an inexplicable glow as his oar cut through the water at night. Modern scientific explanations describe the phenomenon as a type of chemiluminescence born when light-releasing luciferin generated by organisms interreacts with oxygen. In most, if not all, cases this reaction is accelerated by the presence of a luciferase enzyme.

Marine creatures, insects, algae, bacteria and fungi all produce the magical glow that is bioluminescence; and different species do so for different reasons – including disguise, communication, for lighting and as lure. Bacteria and fungi usually shine constantly during phases of bioluminescence, while algae and marine animals give off intermittent light. One of the most widely observed forms of the phenomenon is caused by dinoflagellates, a type of phytoplankton.

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