Unusual

Marshmallow Sofa Fun

Japanese designer Kei Harada approached the design of a sofa asking the question ‘what shape will naturally invite a person?’ – and from this inquiry, he created the ‘O’keeffe’ sofa. Harada built marshmallow-like elements to allow a user to explore different sitting positions, combining the bulging forms in a calculated fashion for an almost climbable structure. Each organic orb is made from styrofoam covered with two types of urethane foam and a stretchable cloth, all attached to wooden frames that function as joints for each pillow.

Wave Clouds

Here’s a collection of beautiful images of a special kind of cloud known to scientists as Kelvin-Helmholtz clouds. These clouds look like breaking ocean waves, with the rolling eddies seen at the top of the cloud layers. The eddies are usually evenly spaced, making the clouds easily identifiable.

Kelvin-Helmholtz clouds are named for Lord Kelvin and Hermann von Helmholtz, who studied the physics of the instability that leads to this type of cloud formation. A Kelvin-Helmholtz instability forms where there’s a velocity difference across the interface between two fluids: for example, wind blowing over water. You’ll often see the characteristic wave structure in this type of cloud when two different layers of air in our atmosphere are moving at different speeds. The upper layers of air are moving at higher speeds and will often scoop the top of the cloud layer into these wave-like rolling structures.

The clouds often form on windy days, when there’s a difference in densities of the air, for example, during a temperature inversion. They’re often good indicators of atmospheric instability and the presence of turbulence for aircraft.

It’s widely believed that these waves in the sky inspired the swirls in van Gogh’s masterpiece Starry Night.

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Whimsical Stone Worshipers

Otagi Nenbutsu-Ji is a Buddhist temple in Kyoto, Japan that features over 1,200 stone figures representing Rakan, or disciples of Shaka (the founder of Buddhism), that were mostly carved by amateurs from across the country under the guidance of sculptor Kocho Nishimura. Each sculpture is a whimsical display of expressive faces, adding a playful element to the spiritual environment.

The figurative sculptures were first donated in 1981, only a little over 30 years ago, allowing the present temple, a reconstruction of its former self which was originally built in the middle of the eighth century, to become known for its humorous figures. Now the smiling faces and expressive gestures still manage to translate through the moss that covers them. Even during winter, when snow coats the small, stone bodies, one can make out the playfully spirited figures.

Info source: My Modern Met

I See Faces!

Seeing faces in ordinary objects is called pareidolia. A study in Finland found that people who are religious or believe strongly in the supernatural are more likely to see faces in lifeless objects and landscapes. Personally, I think the faces are just there whether you’re a believer or not. What do you think?

Aren’t these fun?

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