Funny

Grumpy Cat Has A Few Things To Say

Still here…
worst apocalypse ever.

Some people just need a high five
in the face. With a hammer.

No time to explain.
Get in front of the car.

I’m glad that I’m on TV,
now the nation knows that I hate them.

Free hugs?
Go hug a cactus.

If you’re happy and you know it
I don’t care.

You look happy
Stop it

A Cat’s Guide To Humans

Introduction: Why Do We Need Humans?

So you’ve decided to get yourself a human being. In doing so, you’ve joined the millions of other cats who have acquired these strange and often frustrating creatures. There will be any number of times, during the course of your association with humans, when you will wonder why you have bothered to grace them with your presence. What’s so great about humans, anyway? Why not just hang around with other cats?

Our greatest philosophers have struggled with this question for centuries, but the answer is actually rather simple: They Have Opposable Thumbs. This single attribute makes them the perfect tools for such tasks as opening doors, getting the lids off of cat food cans, changing television stations and other activities that we, despite our other obvious advantages, find difficult to do ourselves. True, chimps, orangutans and lemurs also have opposable thumbs, but they are nowhere as easy to train and their incomes are limited.

How And When to Get Your Human’s Attention

Humans often erroneously assume that there are other, more important activities than taking care of your immediate needs, such as conducting business, spending time with their families or even sleeping. Though this is dreadfully inconvenient, you can make this work to your advantage by pestering your human at the moment it is the busiest. It is usually so flustered that it will do whatever you want it to do, just to get you out of its hair. Not coincidentally, human teenagers follow this same practice.

Here are some tried and trusted methods for getting your human to do what you want:

  • Sitting on paper:

An oldie but a goodie. If a human has paper in front of it, chances are good it’s something they assume is more important than you. They will often offer you a snack to lure you away. Establish your supremacy over this wood pulp product at every opportunity. This practice also works well with computer keyboards, remote controls, car keys and small children.

  • Waking your human at odd hours:

A cat’s “golden time” is between 3:30 and 4:30 in the morning. If you paw at your human’s sleeping face during this time, you have a better than even chance that it will get up and, in an incoherent haze, do exactly what you want. You may actually have to scratch deep sleepers to get their attention. Remember to vary the scratch site to keep the human from getting suspicious.

Punishing Your Human Being

Sometimes, despite your best training efforts, your human will stubbornly resist bending to your whim. In these extreme circumstances, you may have to punish your human. Obvious punishments, such as scratching furniture or eating household plants, are likely to backfire. Being unsophisticated creatures, humans are likely to misinterpret these activities and then try to discipline YOU. Instead, we offer these subtle but nonetheless effective alternatives:

  • Use the cat box during an important formal dinner.
  • Stare impassively at your human while it is attempting a romantic interlude.
  • Stand over an important piece of electronic equipment and feign a hairball attack.
  • After your human has watched a particularly disturbing horror film, stand by the hall cupboard and then slowly back away, hissing and yowling.
  • While your human is sleeping, lie on its face.

Rewarding Your Human: Should Your Gift Still Be Alive?

The cat world is divided over the etiquette of presenting humans with the thoughtful gift of a recently disembowelled animal. Some believe that humans prefer these gifts already dead, while others maintain that humans enjoy a slowly expiring cricket or rodent just as much as we do, given their jumpy and playful movements in picking the creatures up after they’ve been presented.

After much consideration of the human psyche, we recommend the following: cold blooded animals (large insects, frogs, lizards, slow-worms, grass snakes and the occasional earthworm) should be presented dead, while warm blooded animals (birds, rodents, your neighbor’s Chihuahua) are better still living. When you see the expression on your human’s face, you’ll know it’s worth it.

How Long Should You Keep Your Human?

You are only obliged to your human for one of your lives. The other eight are up to you. We recommend mixing and matching, though in the end, most humans (at least the ones that are worth living with) are pretty much the same. But what do you expect? They’re humans, after all. Opposable thumbs will only take you so far.

Found at: Moggycats Cat Pages

Pavlov’s Cats

Everyone has heard of Pavlov’s Dogs and many have heard of Schroedingers Cat. But what of Shroedinger’s Dog and Pavlov’s Cats?

Let’s not concern ourselves with Shroedinger’s Dog, a creature so incredibly stupid and perpetually confused it has difficulty being in one state at a time let alone being in two states simultaneously. When put into a box with a decaying vial of poison which might or might not release the poison, Shroedinger’s Dog chews the vial thus ensuring it ended up in a dead state every time.

Pavlov’s Cats is a far more interesting a subtle experiment into feline-human behaviour. Pavlov was a Welsh behavioural scientist who conducted experiments into ringing bells and cats eating food. His experiments went something along the lines of:

  • Day 1: Rang bell. Cat buggered off.
  • Day 2: Rang bell. Cat buggered off.
  • Day 3: Rang bell, but cat put paw on bell so it only made a ‘thunk’ sound.
  • Day 4: Rang bell, cat said he’d eaten earlier.
  • Day 5: Tried to ring bell, but cat had taken batteries out of bell.
  • Day 6: Cat rang bell. I ate food.

Sure enough, the Pavlov’s Cat experiment proves that scientists can be conditioned to eat cat food and that cats eat only when it suits them. Many scientific discoveries have been made accidentally while trying ot prove something entirely different.

The experiment might have worked had the cat not been buggering off to next door where it had already conditions Pavlov’s neighbor to give it a nice plate of chicken liver. Who knows, it might even have rung the bell and conditioned him to open the door as well, just like my cat has conditioned me …

Pavlov’s second attempt, with new cat possibly went something like this:

  • Day 1: Rang bell. Cat (white) asleep.
  • Day 2: Rang bell. Cat (white) rolled over and snored.
  • Day 3: Rang bell. Cat opened eye (blue), yawned, complained about cheap brand of cat food.
  • Day 4: Rang bell. After 4 hour delay, cat woke up, ate food, went back to sleep.
  • Day 5: Read article about deaf blue-eyed white cats.
  • Day 6: Cat woke me up by sitting on head. Fed cat. Bought dog. Dog drools.

From: Moggy Cats Cat Pages

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― Colette

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