August Spells and Rituals

Prepare for the ritual in your usual way. According to your personal preference, begin with the following:

  • Ground and Center
  • Cast and Raise circle
  • Call quarters

Invitation to the God:

Lord of the night, join me now in this sacred space.
Your Lady rides high in the sky and soon will be in and of me.
Come now to join me in the ancient holy rites.
So Mote It Be !

Spend a few moments becoming aware of the God presence and light the God candle. Most likely a gold, orange or red candle.

Invitation to the Goddess:

Blessed be Lady Moon, mother of all life.
I invite your presence in my circle tonight.
Join me in the joyous enchantment of this Esbat night.
For behold, I stand here in the light of your love to worship
in the ancient way and to spin moon magick like my ancestors before me,
I seek to invoke your primal creative power, that my rite shall be successful.
Hear me now, my mother, as I bless your bounty and your goodness.
bless me in turn with your eternal tenderness.
wrap me in your warm silvery light.
hold me forever in the protective embrace of your boundless arms.
So Mote It Be!

Spend a few moments connecting with the energies of the full moon and light a Goddess candle, usually silver. Honor with songs, cakes and ale, or special reading. At this time you may perform the Drawing Down the Moon ritual or any other magickal workings.

When you are complete, release the god and goddess and thank them for their help and attendance. Release the quarters. Lower and open the circle:

The circle is open
but never broken,
So Mote It Be!

From: Moon Magick

  • Themes: Wishes; Peace; Beauty; Pleasure; Cycles; Time; Mediation
  • Symbols: Falling Stars; Sweetgrass; Peace Pipe
  • Presiding Goddess: Wohpe

About Wohpe:

This Lakota goddess’s name literally means “meteor.” Among the Lakota she is considered the most beautiful of all goddesses. She generates harmony and unity through the peace pipe, and pleasure from the smoke of sweetgrass. Stories also tell us that she measured time and created the seasons so people could know when to perform sacred rituals. When a meteor falls from the sky, it is Wohpe mediating on our behalf.

To Do Today:

Go stargazing! At this time of year, meteors appear in the region of the Perseids, as they have since first spotted in 800 Ad. People around the world can see these, except for those who live at the South Pole. If you glimpse a shooting star, tell Wohpe what message you want her to take back to heaven for you.

To generate Wohpe’s peace between yourself and another (or a group of people) get some sweetgrass (or lemon grass) and burn it on any safe fire source. As you do, visualize the person or people with whom you hope to create harmony. Blow the smoke in the direction where this person lives, saying:

Wohpe, hear my message sure;
keep my intentions ever pure.
Where anger dwells, let there be peace.
May harmony never cease.

Afterword make an effort to get a hold of that person and reopen the lines of communication.

From: 365 Goddess

A Particular Performance by Which it is Caused that a Person will Always Obtain Right Before a Court of Justice.

Take the herb called suntull (skunk cabbage) gathered during the month of August, while the sun stands in the sign of the lion, wrap a little thereof in a bay leaf, add a dandelion to it, carry this talisman on your person, and you will have the best of everybody, and receive the greatest advantage from it.

From: Encyclopaedia of Superstitions, Folklore and The Occult Sciences

In some Wiccan traditions, Lammas is the time of year when the Goddess takes on the aspects of the Harvest Mother. The earth is fruitful and abundant, crops are bountiful, and livestock are fattening up for winter. However, the Harvest Mother knows that the cold months are coming, and so she encourages us to begin gathering up what we can. This is the season for harvesting corn and grain, so that we can bake bread to store and have seeds for next year’s planting. If you would like to hold a Lammas harvest ritual, here’s how:

What You Need:

  • A candle to represent the Harvest Mother
  • Stalks of wheat
  • A loaf of bread
  • Ritual wine (optional)

This ritual celebrates the beginning of the harvest season and the cycle of rebirth, and can be done by a solitary practitioner or adapted for a group or coven setting. Decorate your altar with symbols of the season — sickles and scythes, garden goodies like ivy and grapes and corn, poppies, dried grains, and early autumn foods like apples. If you like, light some Lammas incense.

Have a candle on your altar to represent the Harvest Mother — choose something in orange, red or yellow. These colors not only represent the blaze of the summer sun, but also the coming changes of autumn. You’ll also need a few stalks of wheat and an un-sliced loaf of bread (homemade is best, but if you can’t manage, a store-bought loaf will do). A goblet of ritual wine is optional.

If your tradition requires you to cast a circle, do so now.

Light the candle, and say:

The Wheel of the Year has turned once more,
and the harvest will soon be upon us.
We have food on our tables, and
the soil is fertile.
Nature’s bounty, the gift of the earth,
gives us reasons to be thankful.
Mother of the Harvest, with your sickle and basket,
bless me with abundance and plenty.

Hold the stalks of wheat before you, and think about what they symbolize: the power of the earth, the coming winter, the necessity of planning ahead. What do you need help planning right now? Are there sacrifices you should be making in the present that will be reaped in the future?

Rub the stalks between your fingers so a few grains of wheat fall upon the altar. Scatter them on the ground as a gift to the earth. If you’re inside, leave them on the altar for now — you can always take them outside later. Say:

The power of the Harvest is within me.
As the seed falls to the earth and is reborn each year,
I too grow as the seasons change.
As the grain takes root in the fertile soil,
I too will find my roots and develop.
As the smallest seed blooms into a mighty stalk,
I too will bloom where I landed.
As the wheat is harvested and saved for winter,
I too will set aside that which I can use later.

Tear off a piece of the bread. If you’re performing this ritual as a group, pass the loaf around the circle so that each person present can take off a small chunk of bread. As each person passes the bread, they should say:

I pass to you this gift of the first harvest.

When everyone has a piece of bread, say:

As the grain dies, it transforms to bread,
and brings us life through the winter.
We bless this bread, and it blesses us in return,
and we are thankful for the gift of the harvest.

Everyone eats their bread together. If you have ritual wine, pass it around the circle for people to wash the bread down. Once everyone has finished their bread, take a moment to meditate on the cycle of rebirth and how it applies to your own life – physically, emotionally, spiritually. When you are ready, if you have cast a circle, close it or dismiss the quarters at this time. Otherwise, simply end the ritual in the manner of your tradition.

Article by Patti Wigington

A book of Anglo-Saxon charms advised the crumbling of the Lammas loaf into four pieces and the burying of them in the four corners of the barn to make it safe for all the grain that would be stored there. You can also use this old spellcraft in a protection spell for your home.

Here’s how:

Bake a Lammas loaf, and when it is cool break it into four pieces – don’t cut it with a knife – and take one to each corner of your property with the words:

I call on the spirits
Of north, and south, east and west
Protect this place.

Leave the bread for the birds to eat or bury the pieces.

A recipe for Lammas bread can be found here: Lammas Bread

source

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