Luck

  • ACORN is a symbol of great luck and fortune.
  • ALLSPICE is burned as an incense to attract money or luck, and is also added to such mixtures.
  • ALOE is hung over houses and doors in Africa to bring good luck.
  • ANGELICA is considered lucky. Rub the root between your palms when you gamble or pick your lottery numbers.
  • BAMBOO placed over the door is lucky, since its wood never changes color.
  • BANYAN TREES bring good luck when sat under or looked at.
  • BEECH, carry small pieces of the bark in your pocket for luck and success.
  • BLUEBELL brings luck when it is picked up and the following words recited: “Bluebell, bluebell, bring me some luck before tomorrow night.” Slip it into your shoe to seal the spell.
  • BORAGE, place fresh blossoms on an altar to bring luck and power to your spells.
  • BUCKEYE, rub the buckeye with cinnamon oil and carry in the pocket to increase your luck at winning bets.
  • CALAMUS brings good luck to the gardener when grown.
  • CINNAMON is a favorite of many gods and goddesses, sprinkle powdered cinnamon on offerings to attract attention and win the favor of the gods.
  • CLOVER or SHAMROCK is a symbol of luck, leprechauns, and wishes and is a powerful talisman to carry.
  • COTTON, placed in a sugar bowl will attract good luck, as it will if cotton is thrown over the right shoulder at dawn. In the latter case, the good luck will come before the day is over.
  • DAFFODIL plucked and worn next to the heart will bring good luck.
  • FERN brings good luck to the person who breaks the first fern frond of Spring.
  • HENNA, stain the hands with henna for luck and protection.
  • HICKORY, burn hickory bark for luck and to dispel evil.
  • HOLLY is carried to promote good luck, especially by men, since the holly is a ‘male’ plant. (IVY is the corresponding plant for women.) It is also hung around the house for good luck at Yule.
  • HORSETAIL, carry the dried leaves in your pocket at the racetrack to pick the winners.
  • HUCKLEBERRY, carry or eat the berries for good luck and protection.
  • IRISH MOSS is carried or placed beneath rugs to increase luck and to ensure a steady flow of money into the house or pockets of the person.
  • IVY, growing ivy brings good luck and protection to a property.
  • JOB’S TEARS: Three seeds are carried for good luck.
  • KAVA-KAVA tea is drunk to offer protection against evil and to invite in good luck in Polynesia.
  • LUCKY HAND (hand of Power, Hand Root, Helping Hand, Salap) is the root of an orchid plant and is one of the most famous New Orleans magical botanicals. It has long been placed in sachets and conjure bags for luck and general success.
  • MOJO BEANS, also called African wishing beans. Wear them in a necklace or bracelet or carry loose beans in a red conjure bag for good luck.
  • MOSS taken from a gravestone and carried in your pocket, is a good ensurer of luck, especially financial luck.
  • NUTMEG is a gambler’s favorite, it promotes winning in games of chance.
  • OAK MOSS is great for money and luck formulas.
  • OLIVE leaves, worn, bring luck.
  • ORANGE PEEL is added to prosperity powders, incenses and mixtures, and the Chinese have long considered oranges symbols of luck and good fortune.
  • PERSIMMON: If you wish to have good luck, bury green persimmons.
  • PINEAPPLE, dried, is placed in bags and added to baths to draw good luck to the bather.
  • SEAWEED, scrubbing yourself with seaweed while in the ocean brings good luck and leads to excellent employment opportunities.
  • SHAMROCK or CLOVER is a symbol of luck, leprechauns, and wishes and is a powerful talisman to carry.
  • SNAKEROOT, carry the root of this plant as a luck and money talisman.
  • STRAW is lucky, hence it is often carried in small bags. For a home luck talisman, take a used horseshoe and some straw, sew up into a small bag, and place it above or below the bed.
  • VETIVERT is carried to attract luck.
  • VIOLET flowers are carried to bring changes in luck and fortune.
  • WOOD ROSE is carried to attract good luck and fortune. Also place some in the home to ensure it is lucky as well.
  • YELLOW SPLIT PEAS bring luck and fame.
  • YERBA BUENA is added to gamblers’ luck spells to increase your chances of winning.

Note: This post was put together by Shirley Twofeathers, you may repost and share it only if you give me credit and a link back to this website. Blessed be.

Keys were traditionally made of iron. Consequently, it made good sense to touch a key whenever danger threatened. Keys were considered lucky, and commonly placed under a child’s pillow to keep him or her safe while asleep.

To find an old key is magical. It is said that the finder will experience spiritual mysteries and have prophetic dreams. They will become a channel of communication between heaven and earth. A rusty key is a good omen, as it indicates an inheritance.

Wearing an old-fashioned key will unlock spiritual doors. Perform spells with identical keys, which are then worn by lovers to protect their relationship from infiltration. A key given to a lover who is going far away will keep you in his or her heart.

When lovers exchange keys, it is believed that they are unlocking each other’s hearts. It symbolizes love and happiness.

In Japan, three keys tied together create a powerful lucky charm that attracts love, health, and wealth.

Keys can also be used as a magickal charm or talisman when something needs to be unlocked in some way. For example, Jewish midwives put the key to the synagogue into the hand of a woman who was about to give birth, in the hopes that the association would help the baby “unlock” the door of the womb. Keys were also buried with people in order that the gates to the Underworld would open easily.

It is considered bad luck to drop a key, and even worse luck to accidentally break one. To break a key is an unfortunate omen: it predicts a broken relationship. It is also considered bad luck to jangle bunches of keys on Wednesdays. However, jangling keys can avert the evil eye, and this can be done on any day of the week.

Losing keys is considered an omen of some disaster, usually involving a death.

People turning twenty-one years old were often given cardboard keys to celebrate this milestone of maturity and independence. A popular song in 1912 mentions this custom in the following lyrics:

I’m twenty-one today,
Twenty-one today.
I’ve got the key of the door,
Never been twenty-one before.

Information collected from a variety of sources.

mistletoeRuler: Apollo, Druids, Venus
Type: Herb
Magickal Form: Berries, Leaves, Wood
Use for: Fertility, protection, love, healing, luck, and invisibility

Mistletoe is another important plant that is used in many holiday traditions surrounding the winter solstice. Druids believed that anything found growing on an oak tree had been sent from heaven and mistletoe found on oaks was especially sacred.

Said to lose its power once it touches the ground, mistletoe is a holy herb and sacred to many deities. Mistletoe was perceived as being in a category all its own. Although it lives on trees, it’s not a tree. Although it’s like a plant, it doesn’t grow in either Earth or Water.

In the Celtic language, mistletoe means “All heal” and it was thought to possess miraculous healing powers and hold the soul of the host tree. Mistletoe would be hung over the entry into peoples’ homes and atop doorways within their homes as a token of good will and peace to all comers.

It is said that when warring Viking armies met under a tree in which mistletoe occurred that they would cease battle for the remainder of that day. Today, many people still hang mistletoe in their homes and couples kiss when they meet under the mistletoe.

In some traditions each time a couple kiss under the mistletoe a single white berry is removed and the kissing ceases when the final berry is removed. Kissing a lover under the mistletoe will make this relationship last. There is a myth associated with this practice that stated if any unmarried women of the household went unkissed during the hanging of the mistletoe, they would not marry in the coming year.

As a matter of fact, you can tie mistletoe with a red ribbon and hang it in your home any time of the year for luck, protection and extra kissing.

  • Adding mistletoe to other love potions increases their power.
  • Place the leaves or berries high on a mantel in the home to protect its occupants.
  • Leave a sprig of mistletoe in the home of someone you want to be remembered by.
  • Twist marjoram and thyme around mistletoe and hang it in the corners of each room to attract luck and good fortune.
  • Carve a ring from mistletoe wood and wear it for protection and to ward off illness.

Mistletoe is believed to possess a magical affinity for seizure disorders. To prevent seizures, carry a piece of mistletoe in your pocket or within a conjure bag. Jewelry and charms carved from mistletoe wood can also be worn or carried. The most potent mistletoe seizure charm is a magic knife with an iron blade and a handle carved from mistletoe wood.

Mistletoe berries resemble tiny golden moons enhancing the lunar and fertility symbolism. According to Pliny, a piece of mistletoe carried as an amulet helps a woman conceive. Fertility charms are carved from mistletoe wood, and then carried or attached to a pin and worn as a brooch. The most powerful mistletoe jewelry is embellished with pearls.

Mistletoe allegedly enhances the reproductive capacity of animals. Not only does it promote conception, it’s believed to also prevent miscarriage, particularly for sheep and goats.

Hang mistletoe in the barn, or place it on around the animal in question. Be aware that the amuletic part of mistletoe is usually the “wood” – and again, be cautious as mistletoe can be toxic, especially the berries.

In Sweden mistletoe is known as “thunderbroom.” Place it over thresholds, and hang it from the wall to protect a home from lightning. You can wear mistletoe around your neck to promote invisibility and hang it on a baby’s cradle to prevent fairies from stealing the youngster.

CAUTION: The leaves and berries of mistletoe are poisonous. Use caution when handling and keep away from small children and pets.

Sources: The Element Encyclopedia of 5000 Spells
and The Encyclopedia of Magickal Ingredients

corn37Scientific name: Zea Mays.
Common names: Indian Corn, Maize, Squaw Corn
Type: Vegetable
Ruler: Sun, Aztec and Mayan deities, Earth Mother
Planet: Venus and Saturn
Element: Earth
Magickal Form: On or off the cob, popped, white, yellow, blue, red
Parts used: Seeds, silk, husks
Magickal Properties: Fertility, Protection, Luck, Divination, Prosperity

Corn can be used for spells protection, luck, and in divination. Corn on the altar represents the power of the Corn Mother, She who blesses and nourishes all Her earthly children. Corn on the cob represents the phallic gods and draws creative or sexual energy.

Often Corn husks and Wheat straw are used to create what are called ‘Corn Dollies’. These are usually in the shape of a doll or are woven into various other shapes and are carried as charms or put on an altar. Corn dollies can be hung from the rafters of a house to offer protection for the house and all those who dwell within. Corn can also be used in many forms of fertility magic. Corn silk is a very powerful ingredient when added to love spells; it is designed to attract the person you desire.

Corn can be worn as jewelry or in amulets to make the wearer closer to the spirit of the earth. Corn can be used to divine the future. An old folk spell said that if a damsel found a blood-red ear of maize, she would have a suitor before the year was out. Financial or love wishes that are shouted out as popcorn is popping will come true.

  • Eat yellow corn on the summer solstice (June 21) for blessings of prosperity
  • Consume white corn for spiritual insight
  • Scatter blue corn meal to purify and bless a space
  • Hang red corn above doorways at harvest time to protect rewards that have been reaped

Corn is a sacred Druidic herb of Mean Fomhair (also called Mabon) and of Samhain. Corn is associated with the element of earth and the planets Venus and Saturn. Because Corn was such an important part of the food supply of many early cultures, almost every ancient religion had a Corn God or Goddess.

Some of these Corn deities are: Annonaria, Roman Goddess protector of the Corn supplies; Cerklicing, the Latvian god of fields and Corn; Kurke, the Prussian God of Corn; Nepit, an Egyptian Corn Goddess and Neper an Egyptian Corn-God; Nodutus, the Roman god who was held responsible for making the knots in the stalks of Corn; Nzeanzo, the Sudan god of rain, medicine, Corn, fertility and metal-working; Robigo, a Roman Goddess of Corn; Iyatiku, the Pueblo Corn Goddess; and Gabjauja, the Lithuanian Goddess of Corn (with the advent of Christianity She was, as were so many other Pagan deities, reduced to a demon).

Important note:
Remember that when harvesting Corn for magickal uses it is important to say thank you to the grain spirits:

“Mother of Corn
I harvest thee.
In spring thou wilt
A maiden be.”

Collected from various sources, including Magickal Winds

“Magic is only unexplained science. Science is explained magic. When I study science, I study magic. When I study magic, I study science.” ― C. JoyBell C.
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