Herbs and Spices


In traditional herbal magick there are nine steps to gathering herbs. They are as follows:

First the herb must always be taken with the left hand. This is because the left hand is receptive. When the power of an herb is harvested it is received and not taken.

Second, the wind (if any) must be at your back when the herb is gathered. This is because the wind indicates the presence of spirits and to have them support you from behind is beneficial. To have them pushing against your movements is detrimental and you risk offending them. In other words you are either with the flow or against the flow.

Third, you must never look back over your shoulder. This is because you might scare off the fairy folk and other nature spirits who have gathered to take witness. Thus abandoned, you risk negative charges on the herb.

The fourth step in harvesting an herb is to trace a circle around the herb with your magickal blade. This prepares the spirit of the herb for withdrawing and ensures that it stays with the herb when harvested. It is essential that iron never come in contact with the herb or touch inside the circle at any time. Iron negates magickal magnetic charges.

The fifth step requires that you speak to the herb telling it why you need its help and what you are about to do to it.

The sixth step is to place the herb in a pouch, never letting it touch the soil. If it touches the soil the spirit will pass back into the soil.

The seventh step is to wear no jewelry or clothing and to have abstained from sexual intercourse for seven days (a lunar quarter). This helps to magnetize your aura, and being nude while you gather the herb makes you a creature of Nature again free from the signs of domestication.

The eighth step is to leave a small gift or offering in the hole from where the herb was withdrawn. The traditional offering is a mixture of equal parts of wine, honey, and milk. In place of this, a silver or copper coin may be planted as a gift to the Earth spirit. Perhaps the best offering might well be a new herbal seed.

The ninth and final step is to kiss your hand to the moon as a token of love and respect.

Notes:

When taking an herb in this manner you will want to decide in advance whether you need the entire plant or simply a leaf or two. The leaves will only provide you with pharmaceutical ingredients, as would only the roots or stems. To obtain the spirit of the plant you must harvest the entire plant intact. If you harvest only the leaves of an herb then avoid pouring the libation directly upon the plant. If using a coin simply press it into the soil nearby.

If harvesting wild plants leave a large amount of flowers, seed and root as the plant population of that area will very quickly die out if you go in mob-handed and wrench up the only two plants for miles around.

Source: Wiccan Magick

  • ACORN is a symbol of great luck and fortune.
  • ALLSPICE is burned as an incense to attract money or luck, and is also added to such mixtures.
  • ALOE is hung over houses and doors in Africa to bring good luck.
  • ANGELICA is considered lucky. Rub the root between your palms when you gamble or pick your lottery numbers.
  • BAMBOO placed over the door is lucky, since its wood never changes color.
  • BANYAN TREES bring good luck when sat under or looked at.
  • BEECH, carry small pieces of the bark in your pocket for luck and success.
  • BLUEBELL brings luck when it is picked up and the following words recited: “Bluebell, bluebell, bring me some luck before tomorrow night.” Slip it into your shoe to seal the spell.
  • BORAGE, place fresh blossoms on an altar to bring luck and power to your spells.
  • BUCKEYE, rub the buckeye with cinnamon oil and carry in the pocket to increase your luck at winning bets.
  • CALAMUS brings good luck to the gardener when grown.
  • CINNAMON is a favorite of many gods and goddesses, sprinkle powdered cinnamon on offerings to attract attention and win the favor of the gods.
  • CLOVER or SHAMROCK is a symbol of luck, leprechauns, and wishes and is a powerful talisman to carry.
  • COTTON, placed in a sugar bowl will attract good luck, as it will if cotton is thrown over the right shoulder at dawn. In the latter case, the good luck will come before the day is over.
  • DAFFODIL plucked and worn next to the heart will bring good luck.
  • FERN brings good luck to the person who breaks the first fern frond of Spring.
  • HENNA, stain the hands with henna for luck and protection.
  • HICKORY, burn hickory bark for luck and to dispel evil.
  • HOLLY is carried to promote good luck, especially by men, since the holly is a ‘male’ plant. (IVY is the corresponding plant for women.) It is also hung around the house for good luck at Yule.
  • HORSETAIL, carry the dried leaves in your pocket at the racetrack to pick the winners.
  • HUCKLEBERRY, carry or eat the berries for good luck and protection.
  • IRISH MOSS is carried or placed beneath rugs to increase luck and to ensure a steady flow of money into the house or pockets of the person.
  • IVY, growing ivy brings good luck and protection to a property.
  • JOB’S TEARS: Three seeds are carried for good luck.
  • KAVA-KAVA tea is drunk to offer protection against evil and to invite in good luck in Polynesia.
  • LUCKY HAND (hand of Power, Hand Root, Helping Hand, Salap) is the root of an orchid plant and is one of the most famous New Orleans magical botanicals. It has long been placed in sachets and conjure bags for luck and general success.
  • MOJO BEANS, also called African wishing beans. Wear them in a necklace or bracelet or carry loose beans in a red conjure bag for good luck.
  • MOSS taken from a gravestone and carried in your pocket, is a good ensurer of luck, especially financial luck.
  • NUTMEG is a gambler’s favorite, it promotes winning in games of chance.
  • OAK MOSS is great for money and luck formulas.
  • OLIVE leaves, worn, bring luck.
  • ORANGE PEEL is added to prosperity powders, incenses and mixtures, and the Chinese have long considered oranges symbols of luck and good fortune.
  • PERSIMMON: If you wish to have good luck, bury green persimmons.
  • PINEAPPLE, dried, is placed in bags and added to baths to draw good luck to the bather.
  • SEAWEED, scrubbing yourself with seaweed while in the ocean brings good luck and leads to excellent employment opportunities.
  • SHAMROCK or CLOVER is a symbol of luck, leprechauns, and wishes and is a powerful talisman to carry.
  • SNAKEROOT, carry the root of this plant as a luck and money talisman.
  • STRAW is lucky, hence it is often carried in small bags. For a home luck talisman, take a used horseshoe and some straw, sew up into a small bag, and place it above or below the bed.
  • VETIVERT is carried to attract luck.
  • VIOLET flowers are carried to bring changes in luck and fortune.
  • WOOD ROSE is carried to attract good luck and fortune. Also place some in the home to ensure it is lucky as well.
  • YELLOW SPLIT PEAS bring luck and fame.
  • YERBA BUENA is added to gamblers’ luck spells to increase your chances of winning.

Note: This post was put together by Shirley Twofeathers, you may repost and share it only if you give me credit and a link back to this website. Blessed be.

  • Ruler: Venus
  • Type: Herb
  • Magickal Form: Fresh

Invoke mischief with the chive. It is a great herb to use when action is needed. It stimulates and prods, and although its effects may be uncomfortable, the end results are always positive. Chop and add to salads when  you want to stir things up.

The Romani have used chives in fortune telling. Bunches of dried chives hung around a house were believed to ward off disease and evil.

Lore surrounding chives include the tale that they were given to Alexander the Great in Siberia and that they are a powerful aphrodisiac.

From: Encyclopedia of Magickal Ingredients

  • Ruler: Mars
  • Element: Fire
  • Type: Herb
  • Magickal Form: Fresh or dried, Essential oil
  • Deities: Vishnu, Lakshmi, Erzuli
  • Basic Powers: Purification, Protection, Exorcism, Love

A versatile herb, basil leaves can be used for love, protection, or to attract wealth. Burned in an incense with rose petals, basil helps to restore peace in a relationship. Add to exorcism and protection incenses. Strew your floor with the leaves to dispel discord. Use it in the bath or ingest it in a Philter to restore the vitality of your aura.

Put some basil in your wallet and you will attract money, success and prosperity. Added to an Herbal Amulet it is carried to overcome obstacles to prosperity.

When it was first introduced to England, it was not eaten, but used to provide peace of mind and freedom from pain.

Dried Basil can be lightly sprinkled about the floor and swept out the back door as a purifying floor sweep, because “evil can’t stay where Basil has been.”

To attract love and money, bring the magick of Basil into your home.

  • Grow basil in your garden and around the house.
  • Place pots of fresh basil by your front entrance and around the perimeter of your home.
  • Cook with it, and incorporate it into spell work by placing it in a vase on your altar.
  • Place fresh basil in a vase in a prominent spot in your kitchen, replacing it weekly or as soon as it starts to spoil.

In certain central regions of Mexico, basil is used to draw fortune by hanging the plant in the door or window of the shop. The plant’s growth reflects the wealth of the business, showing how dutifully the owner cares for his shop and the herb.

For happiness and peace in the family, soak dried Basil in water for three days. Strain and sprinkle the water at your doorstep to bring money and success, drive away evil, and have a happy family.

A lust herb, basil’s powerful aroma calls forth the sexual energy; eat it to invigorate the sexual appetite. Basil can also be burned to increase sensual pleasures. Place the dried leaves under a bed to reawaken the sex drive in a relationship. In Romania if a young lady offers a young man a sprig of basil, and he accepts, they are officially engaged. In Italy, basil is thought of as a sign of love.

  • Eat basil on a Tuesday to summon physical strength or to prepare for battle.
  • Consume on a Wednesday to open channels of communication.

Basil belongs to Maitresse Ezili Freda Dahomey, Vodou spirit of luxury, and features in many of her rituals. Holy basil, also called tulsi, is highly revered in Hinduism. It figures in the worship of the god Vishnu, is also associated with Lakshmi, the popular Hindu goddess of good fortune. In Haiti, it is associated with the loa Erzuli.

The ancient Egyptians and ancient Greeks believed it would open the gates of heaven for a person passing on. In Europe, basil is placed in the hands of the dead to ensure a safe journey. In India, they place it in the mouth of the dying to ensure they reach God.

Basil has religious significance in the Greek Orthodox Church, where it is used to sprinkle holy water. The Bulgarian Orthodox Church, Serbian Orthodox Church, Macedonian Orthodox Church and Romanian Orthodox Church use basil to prepare holy water and pots of basil are often placed below church altars

However, basil represented hatred in ancient Greece, and European lore sometimes claims that basil is a symbol of Satan. African legend claims that basil protects against scorpions, while the English botanist Culpeper cites one “Hilarius, a French physician” as affirming it as common knowledge that smelling basil too much would breed scorpions in the brain.

The botanical name for Basil, Ocimum basilicum, is derived from the Greek “to be fragrant.” Despite that meaning, many Greeks disliked basil and believed that scorpions would breed under pots of basil.

In ancient Rome, the name for Basil was Basilescus. This name was in reference to Basilisk, the fire breathing dragon. They thought that ingesting basil would protect them against Basilisk.

Collected from various sources

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Here is a listing of herbs classified by gender. This is simply an old way of categorizing herbs by their basic type of vibration. Another method would be “hot” and “cold” which can be confusing.

Masculine herbs:

Masculine herbs are those which are possessed of strong fiery vibrations. These are the herbs which are actually used for protection, hex breaking, exorcism, lust, to maintain sexual potency, health, strength, courage, etc. as well as any that strengthen the mind. The list is as follows:

Acacia, Allspice, Angelica, Ash, Aspen, Basil, Bay, Bittersweet, Borage, Brazil Nut, Broom, Caraway, Carnation, Cedar, Chamomile, Chestnut, Cinnamon, Clove, Clover, Curry, Dandelion, Dill, Dragon’s Blood, Eyebright, Fennel, Flax, Frankincense, Ginger, Hazel, Heliotrope, Holly, Honeysuckle, Hops, Juniper, Larch, Lavender, Lily of the Valley, Mandrake, Maple, Marigold, Marjoram, Meadowsweet, Mint, Mistletoe, Oak, Orange, Pecan, Pennyroyal, Pine, Pomegranate, Red Sandalwood, Rice, Rosemary, Rowan, Saffron, Sage, Sesame, Sunflower, Thistle, Walnut, Yucca

Feminine herbs:

Feminine herbs are plants which are quieter, subtler, softer in their effects. Thus they are used to attract love, increase beauty, recapture youth, aid in healing and in developing psychic powers, increase fertility, draw wealth, promote happiness and peace, aid sleep and spirituality, and cause visions. The list is as follows:

Aloe, Apple, Apricot, banana, Barley, Beech, Belladonna, Birch, Blackberry, Cherry, Coltsfoot, Comfrey, Cypress, Daffodil, Daisy, Elder, Elm, Eucalyptus, Foxglove, Gardenia, Goldenrod, Grape, Heather, Hellebore, Honesty, Iris, Irish Moss, Ivy, Jasmine, Lady’s Mantle, Lemon, Lilac, Lily, Lucky Hand, Magnolia, Mugwort, Myrrh, Myrtle, Oats, Orchid, Pansy, Peach, Plum, Raspberry, Rose, Rye, Sagebrush, Sandalwood, Strawberry, Tansy, Thyme, Tulip, Vanilla, Violet, Wheat, Willow, Yarrow, Yew

 

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When creating spells for a specific purpose you may want to use herbs or flowers that resonate to a specific elemental power, for example – when igniting the “flames” of passion – you might want to saturate the space with “fire” herbs, when doing a moon spell you might want to use water herbs. Alternatively, for balance you might want a little of each.

With that in mind, here is a comprehensive listing of the four elements and their respective herbal correspondences. There are many different lists of elemental herbs – this was the most extensive one I found. Not every one agrees as to the elemental properties of some of the herbs listed. When in doubt, go with what seems right to you.

Earth: Alfalfa, Barley, Beet, Buckwheat, Corn, Cotton, Cypress, Fern, Honesty, Honeysuckle, Horehound, Horsetail, Knotweed, Loose strife, Mugwort, Oats, Patchouli, Potato, Primrose, Quince, Rhubarb, Rye, Sage, Tulip, Turnip, Vervain, Vetivert, Wheat, Wood sorrel

Water: Aloe, Apple, Apricot, Aster, Bachelor buttons, Banana, Blackberry, Bladder wrack, Bleeding heart, Burdock, Camellia, Cardamom, Catnip, Chickweed, Coconut, Comfrey, Daffodil, Daisy, Elder, Elm, Eucalyptus, Feverfew, Foxglove, Gardenia, Grape, Heather, Hibiscus, Hyacinth, Iris, Jasmine, Lady’s mantle, Lady’s slipper, Larkspur, Lemon, Lilac, Lily, Lotus, Lucky hand, Mesquite, Mimosa, Morning Glory, Myrrh, Myrtle, Orchid, Orris root, Pansy, Passion flower, Pear, Periwinkle, Plum, Plumeria, Poppy, Rose, Spearmint, Spikenard, Strawberry, Sugar cane, Sweet pea, Tansy, Thyme, Valerian, Violet, Willow, Wintergreen, Yarrow

Air: Agrimony, Almond, Anise, Bean, Benzoin, Bergamot, Bittersweet, Borage, Broom, Caraway, Chicory, Dandelion, Endive, Eyebright, Goldenrod, Gourd, Hazel, Lavender, Lemongrass, Lemon verbena, Lily of the valley, Mace, Marjoram, Meadowsweet, Mint, Mistletoe, Mulberry, Parsley, Pine, Pistachio, Rice, Sage, Senna, Slippery elm, Star anise

Fire: Allspice, Angelica, Asafaetida, Basil, Bay, Black pepper, Cactus, Carnation, Chili pepper, Chrysanthemum, Cinnamon, Cinquefoil, Clove, Copal, Coriander, Cumin, Curry, Damiana, Dill, Dragon’s blood, Fennel, Flax, Frankincense, Galangal, Garlic, Ginger, Ginseng, Goldenseal, Hawthorn, Heliotrope, High John the Conqueror, Holly, Hyssop, Lovage, Mandrake, Marigold, Masterwort, May apple, Mullein, Mustard, Nutmeg, Onion, Orange, Pennyroyal, Peppermint, Pomegranate, Rosemary, Rue, Saffron, St John’s Wort, Sassafras, Sesame, Snapdragon, Sunflower, Thistle, Ti, Tobacco, Venus flytrap, Witch hazel, Woodruff, Wormwood, Yucca

From: Elemental Witch

Solar System orbits, artwork

Here is a listing of the planets and the herbs associated with them:

Sun: Acacia, Ash, Bay, Carnation, Cedar, Chamomile, Cimmamon, Hazel, Heliotrope, Juniper, Marigold, Misteltoe, Oak, Orange, Pam, Peony, Rice, Rosemary, Saffron, Sunflower, Tea, Walnut

Moon: Aloe, Cotton, Dulse, Eucalyptus, Gardenia, Grape, Irish Moss, Jasmine, Lemon, Liiy, Myrrh, Poppy, Potato, Sandalwood, Willow

Mercury Almond, Aspen, Bittersweet, Brazil Nut, Caraway, Clover, Dill, Fennel, Fern, Flax, Lavendar, Mandrake, Marjoram, Mint, Mulberry, Parsley, Pecan, Senna

Venus: Apple, Apricot, Avocado, Barley, Birch, Blackberry, Cherry, Corn, Cowslip, Daffodil, Daisy, Elder, Foxglove, Goldenrod, Iris, Lilac, Magnolia, Oats, Pea, Peach, Plum, Raspberry, Rose, Sugar Cane, Thyme, Vanilla, Violet, Willow

Mars: Allspice, Basil, Briony, Broom, Carrot, Chili Pepper, Dragon’s Blood, Ginger, Holly, Hops, Onion, Pennyroyal, Pine, Reed, Thistle, Woodruff

Jupiter: Anise, Bodhi, Chestnut, Clove, Honeysuckle, Maple, Meadowsweet, Nutmeg, Sage, Witch Grass

Saturn: Amaranth, Beech, Belladonna, Cypress, Elm, Hellebore, Ivy, Lady’s Slipper, Mimosa, Pansy, Patchouli, Tamarisk, Yew

Found at: Magic Spells

Wild Thyme

  • Ruler: Fairies, Venus
  • Element: Air
  • Planet: Mercury
  • Type: Herb
  • Magickal Form: Leaf – fresh or dried, Essential Oil

Thyme was called thymos by the Greeks, which meant “fumigate”. They associated thyme with valor in battle, and the restoration of physical power. Roman soldiers were known to bathe in a decoction of thyme before going into combat, to boost strength and courage. The Sumerians used it as an antiseptic, and in Egypt, thyme was one of the herbs which was used in the mummification process.

Thyme cleanses and renews the spirit and calls angelic forces to one’s aid. Long utilized in the energy cleansing and clearing of temples in Greece, thyme can be burned or strewn to disperse stagnant vibrations and invite the new. Bathe in the oil for serious purification after you have come in contact with death.

Thyme can be used in healing rituals, or to bring about restful sleep. Women who wear thyme on their person are irresistible to men, and carrying sprigs in your pocket aids in developing your psychic abilities. Burn some thyme to help boost your courage before confrontations. Add this herb to foods to increase your awareness, sight, and memory.

It is also used in love spells to invoke more gentleness and understanding into a relationship.

Attractive to the fairy folk, thyme can be grown in the garden to entice their plant blessings, and a little thyme under the tongue allows one to see them more clearly.

An herb that helps connect with psychic consciousness, thyme in a divination formula aids the mind in understanding and deciphering psychic visions and impressions.

Burn as incense or wear to attract good health. Place a sprig beneath your pillow to ensure dream-free sleep. It is frequently burned before ritual to cleanse the area. Burn when asking advice of loved ones who have passed on.

Compiled from various sources.

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Thymus mastichina is a very special thyme, native in the mountains of the Iberian Peninsula, Central Spain and Portugal. It is known by a number of different common names including Spanish Marjoram, Spanish Wood Marjoram, White Thyme, Wild Marjoram or Mastic Thyme.

Thymus mastichina should not be confused with Marjoram also known as sweet Marjoram, knotted Marjoram and previously classed as Marjorana hortensis (Origanum majorana). Nor should it be confused with the Mastic Tree (Pistacia lentiscus).

I could not find anything about the magickal properties of this specific plant, and so I would assume that because it is a variety of Thyme, the magickal purposes would be the same as for common Thyme, but possibly with a wilder energy or effect. These would include the following:

  • Cleansing and Clearing
  • Making way for the new
  • Attractive to fairies

Here is what I did find out about this herb:

As the name implies it grows primarily in Spain. Thymus mastichina produces tiny, oval-shaped, green leaves, which have an intense flavor. In its Spanish homeland it is used as a culinary herb for meat dishes, stews and sauces and because of its strong aroma has been commonly used in Andalucía to season and preserve olives.

Despite this fact, it is prized more for its essential oils than for its herbal properties. The plant has an herbaceous scent with eucalyptus-like overtones with a hint of a vanilla note, which, in aromatherapy, is used for its soothing, relaxing effect. It’s oil is pale orange to amber in color and has a distinctive eucalyptus like aroma. It is also considered to be especially beneficial in relaxing muscles.

Used fresh or in dried form, its leaves are used to make an herbal tea that is considered useful in treating sore throats, catarrh and colds. If preferred, the tea can be used to gargle with rather than ingested. Infusions are attributed curative or palliative properties of arthritis and rheumatism. Mastic Thyme, may be effective in protecting against colon cancer.

The species name mastichina and the common name of Mastic Thyme derive from the Greek word massein, meaning ‘to chew’, or the verb mastichein meaning ‘to gnash the teeth’. It is the origin of the English word masticate.

Interestingly, the Mastic Tree is a small Mediterranean evergreen tree (Pistacia lentiscus) of the cashew family. The tree produces an aromatic, ivory-coloured resin, also known as mastic, is harvested as a spice from the cultivated mastic trees grown in the south of the Greek island of Chios in the Aegean Sea. Mastic resin is a relatively expensive kind of spice that has been used principally as a chewing gum. The flavor can be described as a strong, slightly smoky, resiny aroma.

 

The genus name Thyme derives from Latin thymus, which goes back to Greek thymon meaning ‘spirit’, originally meaning ‘smoke’ or ‘to fumigate’ (it is related to Latin fumus meaning ‘smoke’ or ‘perfume’) and the verb thyein meaning ‘smoke, cure or offer an incense sacrifice’.

Thyme was used it as incense, for its balsamic odor. The antiseptic properties of Thyme were also fully recognized in classic times, there being a reference in Virgil’s Georgics to its use as a fumigator, and Pliny tells us that, when burnt, it puts to flight all venomous creatures.

Others derive the name from the Greek word thumus, signifying courage, the plant being held in ancient and mediaeval days to be a great source of invigoration, its cordial qualities inspiring courage.

Lady Northcote (in The Herb Garden) says that among the Greeks, Thyme denoted graceful elegance; ‘to smell of Thyme’ was an expression of praise, applied to those whose style was admirable. It was an emblem of activity, bravery and energy, and in the days of chivalry it was the custom for ladies to embroider a bee hovering over a sprig of Thyme on the scarves they presented to their knights.

 

marjoram_facebook

  • Ruler: AphroditeVenus / Mars
  • Element: Water
  • Planet: Venus
  • Type: Spice
  • Magickal Form: Ground or whole leaves, Essential Oil
  • Magickal UsesGrieving, Happiness, Love, Money, Protection, Psychic Development, Psychic Protection, Tranquility, Weddings

From the Greek word Eros (mountain) and ganos (joy) it was given the name “joy of the mountain.” The Greeks believed when Marjoram sprung from graves, their loved ones were happy in the after life. In Greek weddings couples wore the herb to symbolize the joyful event.

Perfect as an addition to any herbal love combination, marjoram is sacred to the Goddess Aphrodite. An herb that blends the potent energies of Venus and Mars, marjoram brings strength to the union of marriage. Add marjoram to food to promote love and happiness between family members, and strengthen relationships.

Legend has it that if you anoint yourself with Marjoram before bed, you will dream of your future spouse.

It is a great herb to burn before saying “I love you” to a partner for the first time because it guarantees that these words will be mirrored back.. It is woven into bridal wreaths to bring joy to the marriage. Marjoram should be added to all love charms and sachets.

Burned as an offertory, it promotes spiritual bliss and connection to the Divine. As a symbol of familial love, marjoram sprinkled around the perimeter of the home or grown by the front door protects the inhabitants. Grown in the garden, placed around the house or carried, it shields from evil energies.

When placed inside a coffin with the deceased or grown on top of a grave, this herb is said to deliver the soul safely to the next world. Marjoram brings happiness. When carried by living persons, it cures depression. In case you’re confused about the use for both grieving and happiness, it is meant to restore happiness to the grief-stricken.

Put Marjoram around every room of your house for protection from negativity and evil intent. A bit in each room will aid in protection of the home. Mix it with violets when doing this to protect the family from colds and flu. During the winter make an amulet of marjoram and violets to guard against colds.

More Magickal uses for Marjoram:

  • Use it in a bath by placing a mesh bag under the tap water for love and peace.
  • Add to money sachets and mixtures.
  • Burn it over a burner for help in accepting life changes and for anti-sorcery spells.
  • When combined with thyme becomes a powerful spring cleanser.
  • Given to a depressed person, marjoram brings happiness.
  • Carry it in a sachet to protect against evil.
  • Grown in the garden it offers shielding powers against evil.

 

Information gathered from a variety of sources.

“Magic is only unexplained science. Science is explained magic. When I study science, I study magic. When I study magic, I study science.” ― C. JoyBell C.
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