Lists

b86dcfda8c27622825590d0a4fc731bcAlthough you cannot bend someone’s will to your own desires through magic, you can perform a spell to attract new love or to jazz up your current relationship with fresh couple-bonding chemistry. This is a short (and by no means complete) list of essential oils for Love and Passion.

  • Deep heartfelt connections: Rose oil 
  • Passionate Evenings: Ylang-Ylang, Nutmeg, Patchouli, Vanilla
  • Sensuality: Sandalwood, Orange, Basil
  • Libido Boosters: Ginger, Cinnamon, Golden Rod
  • Aphrodisiac: Clary Sage, Jasmine, Neroli, Patchouli, Rosewood

unified_by_rick_lilley-d53hsti

Here is a listing of herbs classified by gender. This is simply an old way of categorizing herbs by their basic type of vibration. Another method would be “hot” and “cold” which can be confusing.

Masculine herbs:

Masculine herbs are those which are possessed of strong fiery vibrations. These are the herbs which are actually used for protection, hex breaking, exorcism, lust, to maintain sexual potency, health, strength, courage, etc. as well as any that strengthen the mind. The list is as follows:

Acacia, Allspice, Angelica, Ash, Aspen, Basil, Bay, Bittersweet, Borage, Brazil Nut, Broom, Caraway, Carnation, Cedar, Chamomile, Chestnut, Cinnamon, Clove, Clover, Curry, Dandelion, Dill, Dragon’s Blood, Eyebright, Fennel, Flax, Frankincense, Ginger, Hazel, Heliotrope, Holly, Honeysuckle, Hops, Juniper, Larch, Lavender, Lily of the Valley, Mandrake, Maple, Marigold, Marjoram, Meadowsweet, Mint, Mistletoe, Oak, Orange, Pecan, Pennyroyal, Pine, Pomegranate, Red Sandalwood, Rice, Rosemary, Rowan, Saffron, Sage, Sesame, Sunflower, Thistle, Walnut, Yucca

Feminine herbs:

Feminine herbs are plants which are quieter, subtler, softer in their effects. Thus they are used to attract love, increase beauty, recapture youth, aid in healing and in developing psychic powers, increase fertility, draw wealth, promote happiness and peace, aid sleep and spirituality, and cause visions. The list is as follows:

Aloe, Apple, Apricot, banana, Barley, Beech, Belladonna, Birch, Blackberry, Cherry, Coltsfoot, Comfrey, Cypress, Daffodil, Daisy, Elder, Elm, Eucalyptus, Foxglove, Gardenia, Goldenrod, Grape, Heather, Hellebore, Honesty, Iris, Irish Moss, Ivy, Jasmine, Lady’s Mantle, Lemon, Lilac, Lily, Lucky Hand, Magnolia, Mugwort, Myrrh, Myrtle, Oats, Orchid, Pansy, Peach, Plum, Raspberry, Rose, Rye, Sagebrush, Sandalwood, Strawberry, Tansy, Thyme, Tulip, Vanilla, Violet, Wheat, Willow, Yarrow, Yew

 

81965752

When creating spells for a specific purpose you may want to use herbs or flowers that resonate to a specific elemental power, for example – when igniting the “flames” of passion – you might want to saturate the space with “fire” herbs, when doing a moon spell you might want to use water herbs. Alternatively, for balance you might want a little of each.

With that in mind, here is a comprehensive listing of the four elements and their respective herbal correspondences. There are many different lists of elemental herbs – this was the most extensive one I found. Not every one agrees as to the elemental properties of some of the herbs listed. When in doubt, go with what seems right to you.

Earth: Alfalfa, Barley, Beet, Buckwheat, Corn, Cotton, Cypress, Fern, Honesty, Honeysuckle, Horehound, Horsetail, Knotweed, Loose strife, Mugwort, Oats, Patchouli, Potato, Primrose, Quince, Rhubarb, Rye, Sage, Tulip, Turnip, Vervain, Vetivert, Wheat, Wood sorrel

Water: Aloe, Apple, Apricot, Aster, Bachelor buttons, Banana, Blackberry, Bladder wrack, Bleeding heart, Burdock, Camellia, Cardamom, Catnip, Chickweed, Coconut, Comfrey, Daffodil, Daisy, Elder, Elm, Eucalyptus, Feverfew, Foxglove, Gardenia, Grape, Heather, Hibiscus, Hyacinth, Iris, Jasmine, Lady’s mantle, Lady’s slipper, Larkspur, Lemon, Lilac, Lily, Lotus, Lucky hand, Mesquite, Mimosa, Morning Glory, Myrrh, Myrtle, Orchid, Orris root, Pansy, Passion flower, Pear, Periwinkle, Plum, Plumeria, Poppy, Rose, Spearmint, Spikenard, Strawberry, Sugar cane, Sweet pea, Tansy, Thyme, Valerian, Violet, Willow, Wintergreen, Yarrow

Air: Agrimony, Almond, Anise, Bean, Benzoin, Bergamot, Bittersweet, Borage, Broom, Caraway, Chicory, Dandelion, Endive, Eyebright, Goldenrod, Gourd, Hazel, Lavender, Lemongrass, Lemon verbena, Lily of the valley, Mace, Marjoram, Meadowsweet, Mint, Mistletoe, Mulberry, Parsley, Pine, Pistachio, Rice, Sage, Senna, Slippery elm, Star anise

Fire: Allspice, Angelica, Asafaetida, Basil, Bay, Black pepper, Cactus, Carnation, Chili pepper, Chrysanthemum, Cinnamon, Cinquefoil, Clove, Copal, Coriander, Cumin, Curry, Damiana, Dill, Dragon’s blood, Fennel, Flax, Frankincense, Galangal, Garlic, Ginger, Ginseng, Goldenseal, Hawthorn, Heliotrope, High John the Conqueror, Holly, Hyssop, Lovage, Mandrake, Marigold, Masterwort, May apple, Mullein, Mustard, Nutmeg, Onion, Orange, Pennyroyal, Peppermint, Pomegranate, Rosemary, Rue, Saffron, St John’s Wort, Sassafras, Sesame, Snapdragon, Sunflower, Thistle, Ti, Tobacco, Venus flytrap, Witch hazel, Woodruff, Wormwood, Yucca

From: Elemental Witch

Solar System orbits, artwork

Here is a listing of the planets and the herbs associated with them:

Sun: Acacia, Ash, Bay, Carnation, Cedar, Chamomile, Cimmamon, Hazel, Heliotrope, Juniper, Marigold, Misteltoe, Oak, Orange, Pam, Peony, Rice, Rosemary, Saffron, Sunflower, Tea, Walnut

Moon: Aloe, Cotton, Dulse, Eucalyptus, Gardenia, Grape, Irish Moss, Jasmine, Lemon, Liiy, Myrrh, Poppy, Potato, Sandalwood, Willow

Mercury Almond, Aspen, Bittersweet, Brazil Nut, Caraway, Clover, Dill, Fennel, Fern, Flax, Lavendar, Mandrake, Marjoram, Mint, Mulberry, Parsley, Pecan, Senna

Venus: Apple, Apricot, Avocado, Barley, Birch, Blackberry, Cherry, Corn, Cowslip, Daffodil, Daisy, Elder, Foxglove, Goldenrod, Iris, Lilac, Magnolia, Oats, Pea, Peach, Plum, Raspberry, Rose, Sugar Cane, Thyme, Vanilla, Violet, Willow

Mars: Allspice, Basil, Briony, Broom, Carrot, Chili Pepper, Dragon’s Blood, Ginger, Holly, Hops, Onion, Pennyroyal, Pine, Reed, Thistle, Woodruff

Jupiter: Anise, Bodhi, Chestnut, Clove, Honeysuckle, Maple, Meadowsweet, Nutmeg, Sage, Witch Grass

Saturn: Amaranth, Beech, Belladonna, Cypress, Elm, Hellebore, Ivy, Lady’s Slipper, Mimosa, Pansy, Patchouli, Tamarisk, Yew

Found at: Magic Spells

tumblr_mhcfotMz1K1qfsdo4o1_500

What follows is a list of items and their uses as charms, fetishes, talismans, or amulets:

  • Acorn: Attracts the opposite gender, increases income, divine powers, and prosperity.
  • Akhet: Ancient Egyptian amulet representing the rising sun. It is held to give the wearer the vigor of the sun god Ra.
  • Alligator Teeth: Protection from sorcery and danger.
  • Animals: Any statue, symbol or image of an animal can be used as a talisman. The meanings will change accordingly to the type of animal, it’s meanings and any cultural significance surrounding them. This even includes fantasy or mythological animals as well.
  • Ankh: An Egyptian amulet meaning life or soul. It symbolizes enduring life and grants the wearer one hundred thousand million years of life.
  • Bell: An amulet used by primitive and Western people whose sound was intended to ward off the evil eye and dispel hostile spirits. In the Middle East bells were attached to the harness of horses and camels for the same purposes.
  • Billiken: A good luck ornament in the shape of a human figure.
  • Cat Whisker: Carrying a cat whisker in the glove box of the car protects against car theft, troubles, accidents and traffic tickets.
  • Chai: A symbol of life. Usually made from gold or silver. It supposedly grants the wearer longevity.
  • Coffin Nails: In was said that a ring made from three nails that had been used in a coffin and dug up in a churchyard would act as a charm against convulsions and fits of every kind.
  • Crickets: As a talisman of good luck,  the Chinese would capture a live cricket and keep it in a box made of weeping willow wood.
  • Cross: Life and divine protection. The Christians believed it to be a supreme amulet against all forces of evil. The sign of the cross was thought to cure illness and drive off demons.
  • Cylinder Seal: A seal cylindrical in shape made of clay, precious stones and limestone worn around the neck by the Sumerians and other ancient people as a signature to authenticate business agreements.
  • Deities: Symbols and images of Gods, like animals will also have varying meanings depending on the God or Goddess used and the particular attribute wanted or needed.
  • Dream Catchers: According to the Sioux, the legends speak to us of the Dream Catcher. It is believed that each carefully woven web will catch your dreams in the night air. Placed over the bed or centered in a window, the bad spirit dreams will become entangled in the new day. The good spirit dreams will always find their way through the center opening, and will gently float down the sacred feather to bless the dreamer with peaceful dreams. Note: If you buy or make your Dream Catcher, make sure the center hole is not covered by a stone or fetish as that traps all dreams.
  • Eye of God: Amulet used to counteract the evil eye. Made of sticks and colored yarn by Huichol Indians of Mexico and attributed with power of protecting people, homes, and fields.
  • Eye of Horus: Egyptian Eye of God made of gold, copper, silver, clay, faience, or wood and worn to acquire strength, vitality, and protection against the evil eye.
  • Four Leaf Clover: Good luck amulet. The four leaves going clockwise from the left side of the stem represents fame, wealth, love, and health.
  • Fox Tail: Good luck amulet attached to personal possessions. Primitive people believed that it endowed the owner with the cunning of the animal.
  • Heart: An amulet worn by many people around the world. It’s a symbol of love and devotion. Ancient Egyptians thought the heart was the abode of the soul. In Europe a heard amulet was reputed to prevent heart disease.
  • Hexagram: A figure of six lines forming a six pointed star. It is worn in many parts of the world as a protection against evil. A widely worn symbol of the Jewish faith called Morgen David, shield or, popularly, star of David.
  • Horn of Plenty: A contemporary amulet symbolizing prosperity, modeled on the legendary cornucopia overflowing with flowers and fruit.
  • Horseshoes: Nail a horseshoe above the door way leading into a home, keep it pointed upwards so as to keep the luck from running out.
  • Knot: An amulet usually of knotted string or cord that was believed to hold the love of a sweetheart or ward off illness.
  • Lizard Tail: In many species, as seen by geckos especially, the tail drops off when seized by a predator, allowing them to escape and a new tail grows to replace the old one. For this reason, lizard tails are regarded as good luck talismans.
  • Magic Triangle: Cabbalistic amulet based on the belief that by reducing the size of an inscription, line by line, and evil spirit could be eased out of the sufferer.
  • Mezuzah: Doorpost amulet designed to keep a house safe from evil spirits, demons, ghosts. and good fortune in travel. To assure good fortune it should be worn as a waxing, not a waning moon. That is, with the points to the left.
  • Mirrors: The mirror is the quickest way to send back negativity or to absorb it. In ritual, cleanse, consecrate and empower the mirror for protection. Hang the mirror in a central place of the house where it will absorb the negative energy of the house. This is also the source of the term: “Break a mirror, you’ll have seven years bad luck” as the person who breaks the mirror, takes all the negative energy absorbed by the mirror into themselves.
  • Moon: Amulet worn in ancient and modern times to bring success in love and good fortune in travel. To assure good fortune it should be worn as a waxing, not a waning moon. That is, with the points to the left.
  • Nefer: An amulet worn by the Egyptians. It represents beauty and goodness. It probably is a form of the heart and windpipe, and was thought to bring youth and happiness. Very popular for making necklaces.
  • Pennies: “See a penny, pick it up and all day long you’ll have good luck.” Popular to this is if the penny is heads up when found, it’s good luck. Tails it’s bad luck. To avert this, place the penny in your left shoe to counter the bad luck and give a day, 24 hours of good luck. Pennies placed in the left shoe were also a ward against the magicks of fairies, particularly the harmful ones.
  • Pentagram: A five pointed star representing the five elements of air, fire, water, earth, and spirit. Also represents the figure of a human being. It is thought to protect the wearer from all kinds of evil spirits. Can also be used by magicians to control spirits. Should be worn with one point up.
  • Porcupine Quills: Supposedly charms against the evil eye.
  • Rings: Worn as amulets to treat illness, dispel forces of evil, keep lovers together, and prevent flight of the soul from the body.
  • Scarab: A variety of beetle: image of beetle in clay, faience, precious stones, or other material. Acquire the strength and long life of the god of creation. Was also thought to speak up in the judgment room for a favorable verdict for their master.
  • Sma: An amulet representing the shape of lungs. Was used by Egyptians to give breathing power to the dead by placing on their mummies.
  • Star: Ward off evil or encourage good fortune.
  • Sun: Said to bestow prosperity and friendship. Probably of Egyptian origin.
  • Tassels: Tassels or Fringes, as used during the medieval ages and after have been used as protective devices, because they confuse and distract evil or negative entities.
  • Turtle or tortoise: shaped charm provides courage, creativity, intelligence, spiritual protection, compassion, fertility, sexuality,and protection.

Authors Details: Unknown Source
Found at: spiritual.com.au

svet-cvet-luchi-raduga-kraski

In magick, colors represent certain energies, goals, people and non-physical beings, such as deities or spiritual forces. For this reason, you should include candles, gemstones, cords and other objects of differing colors in your magick rituals.

Colors also often have personal meanings for us. Anytime a person employs the symbolism inherent in colors, they are in effect using magick. Common examples of this can be found in such phrases as “green with envy”, “black with rage”, “feeling blue”, “in the pink” and many more.

The particular symbolism of any given color may vary widely from source to source, and depending upon whether you are burning a candle, knotting a cord, draping an altar or creating a talisman. You will find that many books, such as Buckland’s Practical Candleburning Rituals, offer different suggestions for colors when used in magick. In addition, there are also colors for astrological signs and planetary or elemental magick..

Some magickal systems use “flashing colors” – those that are complimentary, such as red and green – to create an optical illusion that appears to flash when placed together. Such “flashing colors” are said to have great power in attracting the corresponding magickal forces. “Flashing colors” can be used in almost any type of ritual or spell work where you will be using colors, particularly when the visual aspect of the color is important.

Below are links to basic information on each of the colors:

Note: These are only guides to use for reference, As we each are individuals, so are our choices, always let your own feelings determine your color choices. Don’t be afraid to experiment with colors and find what and how it works best for you!

Found at:  Real Magick

 

BS-Supermarket-1260x840-1024x683

Here are some simple spells which use ingredients found in any supermarket.

  • Chocolate is excellent for money.
  • Spinach can help you get a job.
  • Bitter foods will make you work harder, sweet foods will ease the pressure on a workaholic (try honey, not junk food).
  • Apples are sacred to Aphrodite, so cut one in half and give it to your lover to enrapture them.
  • Get the one you want out of your life out of it by serving them a bowl of turnips. They’ll leave you – you won’t have to do a thing.
  • Ginger tea, or bathing with ginger will relieve stress.
  • Oats in a sock, popped in the bath, promotes gentleness and soft beauty.

blended-flower-bouquet-2_300Flowers may be combined and arranged so as to express even the subtlest shades of sentiment. Here are some examples of how to use the language of flowers to send a message:

  • Moss Rosebud and MyrtleA confession of love
  • Mignonette and Coloured DaisyYour qualities surpass your charms of  beauty
  • Lily of the Valley and FernsYour unconscious sweetness has fascinated me
  • Yellow Rose, Broken Straw and IvyYour jealousy has broken our friendship
  • Scarlet Geranium, Passion Flower, Purple Hyacinth, and Arbor VitaeI trust you will find consolation, through faith, in your sorrow; be assured of my unchanging friendship.
  • Columbine, Day Lily, Broken Straw, Witch Hazel  and Coloured DaisyYour folly and flirtatiousness have broken the spell of your beauty.
  • White Pink, Canary Grass and LaurelYour talent and perseverance will win you glory.
  • Golden-rod, Monkshead, Sweet Pea, and Forget-me-notBe cautious; danger is near; I depart soon; forget me not.

Source

The language of flowers, sometimes called florigraphy, was a Victorian-era means of communication in which various flowers and floral arrangements were used to send coded messages, allowing individuals to express feelings which otherwise could not be spoken. This language was most commonly communicated through Tussie-Mussies, an art which has a following today.

lens3775412_1250128781bookflwer

The nuances of the language are now mostly forgotten, but red roses still imply passionate, romantic love and pink roses a lesser affection; white roses suggest virtue and chastity and yellow roses still stand for friendship or devotion. Also commonly known meanings are sunflowers, which can indicate either haughtiness or respect – they were the favorite flower of St. Julie Billiart for this reason. Gerbera (daisy) means innocence or purity. The iris, being named for the messenger of the gods in Greek mythology, still represents the sending of a message. A pansy signifies thought, a daffodil regard, and a strand of ivy fidelity.

These language correspondences can be used when creating a spell, planting a magickal garden, to set an intention, or to send a message. You may notice some of the flowers (and plants) have meanings that seem incongruent or inconsistent. This is because language tends to change over time. Also, you may find that magickal correspondences to some of these flowers are in direct conflict – that is because the meanings were not derived from magickal sources. When in doubt, go with the meaning that resonates with your personal experience, and be clear with your intention. Pictures may be substituted for the actual flower or plant.

Here’s the list:

A

  • AcaciaSecret love
  • Acanthus  – Art
  • Aconite – Misanthropy
  • Acorn – Nordic Symbol of Life and immortality
  • African MarigoldVulgar minds.
  • Agrimony – Thankfulness
  • AllspiceCompassion
  • Aloe – Grief
  • Almond (Common) – Stupidity. Indiscretion.
  • Almond (Flowering) Hope  – Promise, Hope,
  •  Almond (Tree) – Giddiness; heedlessness Stupidity, thoughtlessness
  • Alyssum (Sweet) – Worth beyond beauty.
  • Amaranth (Globe) – Immortal love
  • Amaryllis – Pride; Pastoral Poetry
  • Ambrosia – Your Love is Reciprocated
  • Anemone – Forsaken, sickness, unfading love
  • Apple Blossom – Preference, Fame speaks him great and good.
  • Apple (Thorn) – Deceitful charms.
  • Apricot FlowerDoubt, distrust
  • Arborvitae – Everlasting friendship
  • Arbutus – You’re the only one I love
  • Arum – Ardor
  • Asparagus – Fascination
  • Aspen TreeSighing, Lamentation
  • Asphodel – My regrets follow you to the grave
  • Aster Symbol of love, daintiness, talisman of love
  • Aster (China) – Fidelity, variety, I will think of you
  • Autumn Leaves – Melancholy
  • Azalea – Take Care, temperance, fragile, passion, Chinese symbols of womanhood

B Continue reading

“Magic is only unexplained science. Science is explained magic. When I study science, I study magic. When I study magic, I study science.” ― C. JoyBell C.
Moon Phase Tracker
CURRENT MOON

This widget uses flash and may not display properly on every device. A different version can be found at the bottom of the page.

Breadcrumbs
Be Merry!


I think it's time to go shopping... maybe even buy some really cool stuff at one of my online shops!!