Flowers

Furze (also known as Gorse) is a druid Sacred tree, whose flowers are associated with the Vernal Equinox (Aprox. March 20).

  • Latin name: ulex europaeus
  • Celtic name: ‘O’ – Onn
  • Folk or Common names: Broom, Frey, Furze, Fyrs, Gorst, Goss, Prickly Broom, Ruffet, and Whin.
  • Parts Used: Flowers

Magical History and Associations:

Furze is a thorny shrub with bright yellow flowers that is associated with the Spring Equinox. This herb is a symbol of the young sun at the spring equinox and royalty. Furze is associated with the astrological sign of Aries, the planet of Mars, the element of Fire, and is a masculine herb. Furze is associated with Jupiter, Thor, Onn, and also with the Gallic ash-grove Goddess On-niona. The color for Furze is dun, and its bird is the cormorant.

Magickal usage:

Furze is a symbol of fertility and has the magickal uses of Protection and Money. Furze is also used in money spells; it attracts gold. Furze is a good herb to use as a proctectant against evil. In Wales hedges of the prickly Gorse are used to protect the home against dark fairies, who cannot penetrate the hedge. Furze wood and blooms can be burned for protection and also for preparation for conflict of any sort. There are two school of thought about giving Furze flowers as a gift. On one had the gift is supposed to be good luck, but on the other hand if you give them to someone that you love it means: Anger.

There is an old rhyme about Furze that refers to its all-year-round flowering habits:

“When Gorse is out of bloom,
Kissing is out of season.”

 

Source: dutchie.org

As spring arrives, our gardens begin to bud and eventually bloom. For hundreds of years, the plants that we grow have been used in magic. Flowers in particular are often connected with a variety of magical uses. Now that spring is here, keep an eye out for some of these flowers around you, and consider the different magical applications they might have.

Crocus: This flower is one of the first you’ll see in the spring, and it’s often associated with newly blooming love. The crocus is also known to enhance visions and bring about intuitive dreams.

Daffodil: The bright petals of the daffodil are typically found in shades of white, yellow or even pale orange. This flower is associated with love and fertility — place fresh ones in your home to bring about abundance. Wear this flower close to your heart to draw love and luck.

Cowslip: The fragrance has healing properties.

Dandelion: The leaf of the dandelion is used for healing, purification, and ritual cleansing. To bring positive change about, plant dandelions in the northwest corner of your property. The bright yellow flowers can be used in divination, or placed in a sachet to draw good energy your way.

Echinacea: Also called purple coneflower, this garden mainstay adds a little bit of magical “oomph” to charms and sachets. Use it for prosperity related workings. Burn the dried flowers in incense, and use on your altar during ritual as an offering to deities.

Goldenseal: This sunny yellow flower is often found growing in the wild, alongside roads and in fields. Use it in money spells, or for business dealings. Work it into charms connected to matters of financial gain or legal issues.

Hibiscus: This lusty flower incites passion — use it to attract love or lust, or for prophetic dreams about your lover. Burn in incense, or carry in a sachet to bring love your way. Red Hibiscus flowers are used in love potions and placed in wreaths in marriage ceremonies.

Hyacinth: This flower was named for Hyakinthos, a Greek divine hero who was beloved by Apollo, so it’s sometimes considered the patron herb of homosexual men. Hyacinth is also known to promote peaceful sleep, and guards against nightmares. Carry in an amulet to help heal a broken heart or to ease grief when a loved one dies.

Lily: The Easter lily or Tiger lily is associated with all kinds of Spring connections — fertility, rebirth, renewal and abundance.

Marigold or Calendula: Add calendula to your bath to win the respect and admiration of your peers. String garlands of calendula around the outside doors to stop evil from entering the house.

Morning Glory: Morning Glory seeds under your pillow will stop nightmares. Grown in the garden, blue morning glories will bring peace and happiness.

Narcissus: Named for another Greek figure, the Narcissus helps promote polarity and harmony. Its calming vibrations bring about tranquility and inner peace.

Passion Flower: Placed in a house, it calms problems and troubles and brings peace. Carried, it attracts friends and popularity. Placed beneath the pillow, it aids in sleep.

Rose: Used in love and harmony spells. Roses planted in your garden will attract fairies. Rose petals sprinkled around the house will calm stress and reduce household upheavals.

Snapdragon: Place a vase of fresh snapdragons on the altar while performing protective rituals. If someone has sent you negativity energy (hexes, curses, etc.), place some snapdragons on the altar with a mirror behind them to send the negative energy back to the sender.

St. John’s Wort: wards off fevers and cold when worn; burn to banish evil spirits; gather it on a Friday and wear it to cure melancholy — (also known as Hypericum).

Sunflower: Sunflowers growing the garden guard it against pests and grant the best of luck to the gardener.

Tulip: The tulip appears in many different colors and varieties, but is typically connected to prosperity. You can use the different colored variations in color magic — use a dark strain such as Queen of the Night for full moon rituals, or bright red flowers for love magic.

Violet: In Roman myth, the first violet sprung from the spilled blood of the god Attis, who killed himself for Cybele, the mother goddess. However, today the violet is associated with tranquility and peace. The leaf offers protection from evil, and can be sewn into a pillow or sachet for a new baby. Carry the petals with you to bring about luck and enhance nighttime magic.

Source unknown

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Symbolizing rebirth and new beginnings, the daffodil is virtually synonymous with spring. Though their botanic name is narcissus, daffodils are sometimes called jonquils. In England the daffodil birth flower is known as the “Lent Lily” because it blooms during lent.

Daffodils are ruled by Venus. The part of the plant that is normally used in magick is the flowers – either fresh or dried.

  • Sprinkle dried petals or place fresh flowers on an altar to attract friendly spirits.
  • Keep in the house or garden to cheer you up.
  • Add to bathwater to increase your luck and bring new people into your life.
  • Mix with rose petals and place around a photo of a lover you want to return to you.

Lore connecting the daffodil to not only a sign of winter’s end but a lucky emblem of future prosperity is found throughout the world. In Wales, it’s said if you spot the first daffodil of the season, your next 12 months will be filled with wealth, and Chinese legend has it that if a daffodil bulb is forced to bloom during the New Year, it will bring good luck to your home. As the daffodil is one of the first flowers of spring, it has the flower meaning of hope.

The March birth flower and the 10th wedding anniversary flower, a gift of daffodils is said to ensure happiness. But always remember to present daffodils in a bunch – the same legends that associate this cheerful flower with good fortune warn us that when given as a single bloom, a daffodil can foretell misfortune.

Daffodil commonly refers to narcissus with large trumpets, but may be used for all types of narcissus. The March birth flower daffodil that is commonly known, is yellow with a sweet fragrance. It is native to the Mediterranean, but has been cultivated all over the world as a decorative plant.

From: Encyclopedia of Magickal Ingredients

shutterstock_1070390

  • Ruler: Venus, Oshun, Taurus
  • Type: Flower
  • Magickal Form: Flowers, Oil, Thorn

Roses are a metaphor for the human heart. No flower represents love more vividly. Perhaps nothing does. Roses are sacred to the most powerful spirits of love: Aphrodite, Juno, Isis, Kybele, Maitresse Ezili, and Maria Padilha. Oshun loves yellow roses.

Cleopatra, the living embodiment of Aphrodite and Isis, seduced Marc Anthony in a scented bedroom, packed knee-deep with rose petals.

This scent is generally worn as a perfume to attract love. Often the dried flowers are added to success formulas. This flower is always a good choice to adorn your love altar. Keep the flowers fresh and change them every Friday.

Use white roses for cleansing and to heal problems in love.

Use yellow roses – for friendship, though they can also denote jealousy if not given by a true friend. The Yoruban goddess Oshun loves these flowers. Float five ( or any multiple of five) fresh yellow roses in a river and ask Oshun to fulfill a wish concerning fame, wealth, admiration, or love. Promise to give her more after she fulfills your request.

Red roses symbolize passion and true love. Drink a tea of dried red rosebuds to increase your passion. Prepare a bath with red rose petals and a cup of rosewater or three drops of rose oil to infuse your aura with sexuality.

No other plant is as intimately linked with love as the rose. When selecting healing roses, seek out the old-fashioned scented types such as those listed below, rather than the more neutral tea roses:

  • Apothecary’s Rose: the fragrant rose from which a very high quality of rose water is made.
  • Belle de Crecy: considered by some to contain the purest rose scent.
  • Celestial: a rose with a crisp and clean aroma.
  • Kazanlik: a Bulgarian rose oil also called attar of roses is made from this rose. It throws off a potent smell – very heady.
  • Maiden’s Blush: is considered to be a more refined scent.
  • Madame Isaac Pereire, Guinee, and Souvenir de la Malmaison: are stunning and highly fragrant.

Roses are beautiful and like the lotus, they suggest female genitalia in the height of passion. The blush of the rose is often compared to the blush of a bride or a sexual partner during orgasm. In parts of Africa and the Middle East, holy temples are spiritually cleansed, entirely with highly potent Bulgarian rose water typically called rose hydrosol or simple rose water. Rose hydrosol enhances the sacred environment.

Fresh roses, rose water, rose otto (attar of roses), rose cream, and rose incense all cast a magical spell, binding love and romance.

A little-known fact is that roses are a systemic nervine – translation: they calm and soothe your nerves. Whatever you need – calm, balance, stimulation, an aphrodisiac, cooling off after an argument – rose otto or attar of roses can help. Rose otto is very expensive, but it is also very powerful – a few drops will do the trick! Add 2 drops to a full bath, to a dream pillow, sachet, or mojo bag. (Note: Pregnant women should avoid the use of rose otto.)

Bulgarian roses are widely available in East Indian shops and health food stores, prepared as a rose water that can be put into a spray bottle. Rose water is considered cleansing, a blessing oil that also purifies the environment.

Found in:

first-snowdrops-flowers

  • Scientific Name: Galianthus nivalis
  • Common Names: Fair Maid of February; Bulbous Violet; Emblem of Early Spring; Maids of February; Candlemas Bells; Mary’s Tapers; Moly
  • Type: Flower
  • Parts Commonly Used: The flower
  • Basic Powers: Hope, Friendship in adversity, Passing of sorrow,

Snowdrops are often assigned to the month of January, and I’m not sure why because these little flowers are  also known as “Candlemas Bells”.  February 2nd is Candlemas (Festival Day of Candles), and Imbolc.  The ancient festival marks the midpoint of winter and some recognize it as the last day of the forty day Christmas season.  In the catholic tradition, candles were brought into the church and blessed as a symbol of hope and light. In a time of no electric lights, candlelight offered great protection and comfort during the dark days of winter.

By producing their own heat, snowdrops actually melt the snow in their surroundings. Like candles, Snowdrops offer us our own light of hope in the grey of winter days. They are the emblems of friendship in adversity, harbingers of spring.

The first sight of snowdrops growing wild represents the passing of sorrow. In various religions, they are a sign from the gods that good times will come once more. According to one Christian tale, an angel turned falling snowflakes into flowers to give Adam and Eve a sign of hope after evicting them from the Garden of Eden.

The fact that snowdrops are often found, in abundance, in the old convent gardens, it was believed that this little white flower was sacred to virgins. For this reason, it was dedicated to the Virgin Mary. In some places, during the Candlemas celebration, it was customary for young women, wearing white gowns, to walk in procession carrying snowdrops in their hands.

It was often said that any one wearing a snowdrop would have only pure and lofty thoughts; and that if a young girl ate the first snowdrop she found in spring, neither sun nor wind would tan her that summer.

The snowdrop flower – which is well loved not only for its simple beauty, but for its distinct, honey-like scent – has a surprisingly varied history in both ancient folklore and more modern storytelling. In Grimm brother’s original version of the fairy tale nowadays known as Snow White, the main character’s name was actually Snow Drop.

Every spring on March 1, the national Moldovan holiday, is celebrated. On this day people present each other with the traditional flowers. One of the old Moldovan legend says that once in a fight with the winter witch, that didn’t want to give up its place, the beautiful lady Spring cut her finger and few drops of her blood fell on the snow, which melted. Soon on this place grew a snowdrop and in such a way the spring won the winter.

However, in some folklore, snowdrops are seen as unlucky. The reason for this is perhaps that they often grow in cemeteries and churchyards. Along with other white flowers, superstition says it is courting disaster to bring snowdrops into the house. To do so is to invite death into the home, can mean the parting of a loved one and, in the west country, is thought to cause eggs to turn addled. One should never even pick wild snowdrops, especially from a graveyard. The sight of a single snowdrop blooming in the garden foretells of impending disaster.

According to Are You Superstitious, by Lore Cowan, it is particularly unlucky to bring snowdrops, or “Candlemas bells”, into the house on February 2nd, which is Candlemas, or Imbolc, and if you wish to be married within the year you should not bring them into the house on Valentine’s Day, 14th February.

Snowdrops have their use in medicine. The alkaloid Galantamine, which was first isolated from snowdrops, has been used to treat Alzheimer’s disease, neuritis and neuralgia. In parts of eastern Europe, rubbing snowdrops on the forehead was at one time a folk remedy used as pain relief.

Andreas Plaitakis and Roger Duvoisin in 1983 suggested that the mysterious magical herb moly that appears in Homer’s Odyssey is actually snowdrop. An active substance in snowdrop is called galantamine, which, as an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, could have acted as an antidote to Circe’s poisons.

Note: This post was compiled by Shirley Twofeathers for Magical Ingredients, you may repost and share without karmic repercussions, but only if you give me credit and a link back to this website. Blessed be.

asteraceae_-_aster_amellusScientific Name: Asteraceae
Folk Name: Michaelmas Daisies, Frost Flowers, Starworts
Type: Flower
Ruler: Venus
Parts Commonly Used: Blossoms, Leaves (rarely)
Basic Powers: Loving vibrations, Healthy emotions, Contentment, Protection

Also known as starworts, Michaelmas daisies or Frost flowers, the name aster is derived from the Greek word for “star,” This is largely due to the shape of the flower’s head; however, it is also because they grow in a spotted abundance and have an appearance similar to that of the stars in the sky.

With their wildflower beauty and lush texture, asters have long been considered an enchanted flower. The Greeks and Romans believed this flower was sacred to the gods and so wreaths of asters were placed on their altars.

In mythology, asters were said to have grown from the tears of the goddess Asterea. This ancient myth arises from the Iron Age, when people learned to make weapons of iron, the god Jupiter, was angered by all the fighting wiith these iron weapons that he decided to destroy the entire race by a flood. The gods fled the earth and the last to go, the goddess Astraea, was so saddened that she asked to be turned into a star. When the flood waters receded, all that was left was mud and slime. Astraea felt so sorry for them she wept, her tears falling as stardust which turned to lovely starflowers or asters. while she wept for the lack of stars on earth.

Roman mythological legend holds that one of the dryads presiding over the forest, meadows and pastures, the nymph Belides, was responsible for the origin of this flower. While dancing on the turf at the edge of the forest with the other nymphs, Belides attracted the admiration of the deity who presided over the orchards whose name was Vertumnus. She transformed herself into the flower bellis, it’s botanical name, to escape the pursuit of Vertumnus. The bellis flower is derived from the Anglo-Saxon “daeges eage”  (day’s eye) from the habit of this flower to close its petals at night and on dark rainy days.

Another legend has it that the fields bloomed with asters when Virgo scattered stardust on the earth.

Asters are ancient wildflowers of the daisy family, and attract butterflies to your yard. There are over 600 species of aster, the most popular being the Monte Casino. These star-like flowers can be found in a rainbow of colors – white, red, pink, purple, lavender and blue, with mostly yellow centers.

Asters are sacred to Venus. Incorporate asters into spells and charms to enhance loving vibrations and healthy emotions. Adding these beautiful flowers to your garden brings love and contentment to your entire household.

Historically, aster flowers have had many uses. One of the best known is their use when placed upon the graves of French soldiers; these flowers were meant to symbolize afterthought, the wish that things had turned out differently, and to represent a desire for the reversal of the outcome of their battles.  In China, they signify fidelity.

Known as “Eye of Christ” in France and “Starwort” in England and Germany, asters were thought to carry magical powers. The early English name, Starwort, was later changed to Michaelmas Daisy, as it blooms around St. Michaelmas Day in September.

In ancient Greece, aster leaves were burned, as it was thought that the smokey perfume would keep ward off wicked spirits and drive away serpents.

Asters may also be used for their strong medicinal properties. Some varieties of this flower are said to help with migraines, general headaches and colds, while others can aid in treating the pain of sciatica and muscle spasms. Virgil wrote that the flavor of honey would be improved if asters were boiled in wine and placed near a beehive.

In addition to having a wide array of colors to choose from, the aster flower also has a good deal of meaning to go alongside its good looks. In general, the aster is considered a symbol of patience, daintiness, and a love of variety. Others state that this flower is an emblem for refinement and elegance.

As a gift, asters placed in a bouquet with complementing flowers can be representative of love and admiration. They are often given to those born in September, or those celebrating a 20th wedding anniversary. As a more unique gift, you might present a single fresh or dried flower to a lover or friend as a love charm, as asters were thought by some ancient Greeks to hold the mystic power of drawing forth affection.

Found at: Flower Info and Meanings and Legends of Flowers

blended-flower-bouquet-2_300Flowers may be combined and arranged so as to express even the subtlest shades of sentiment. Here are some examples of how to use the language of flowers to send a message:

  • Moss Rosebud and MyrtleA confession of love
  • Mignonette and Coloured DaisyYour qualities surpass your charms of  beauty
  • Lily of the Valley and FernsYour unconscious sweetness has fascinated me
  • Yellow Rose, Broken Straw and IvyYour jealousy has broken our friendship
  • Scarlet Geranium, Passion Flower, Purple Hyacinth, and Arbor VitaeI trust you will find consolation, through faith, in your sorrow; be assured of my unchanging friendship.
  • Columbine, Day Lily, Broken Straw, Witch Hazel  and Coloured DaisyYour folly and flirtatiousness have broken the spell of your beauty.
  • White Pink, Canary Grass and LaurelYour talent and perseverance will win you glory.
  • Golden-rod, Monkshead, Sweet Pea, and Forget-me-notBe cautious; danger is near; I depart soon; forget me not.

Source

The language of flowers, sometimes called florigraphy, was a Victorian-era means of communication in which various flowers and floral arrangements were used to send coded messages, allowing individuals to express feelings which otherwise could not be spoken. This language was most commonly communicated through Tussie-Mussies, an art which has a following today.

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The nuances of the language are now mostly forgotten, but red roses still imply passionate, romantic love and pink roses a lesser affection; white roses suggest virtue and chastity and yellow roses still stand for friendship or devotion. Also commonly known meanings are sunflowers, which can indicate either haughtiness or respect – they were the favorite flower of St. Julie Billiart for this reason. Gerbera (daisy) means innocence or purity. The iris, being named for the messenger of the gods in Greek mythology, still represents the sending of a message. A pansy signifies thought, a daffodil regard, and a strand of ivy fidelity.

These language correspondences can be used when creating a spell, planting a magickal garden, to set an intention, or to send a message. You may notice some of the flowers (and plants) have meanings that seem incongruent or inconsistent. This is because language tends to change over time. Also, you may find that magickal correspondences to some of these flowers are in direct conflict – that is because the meanings were not derived from magickal sources. When in doubt, go with the meaning that resonates with your personal experience, and be clear with your intention. Pictures may be substituted for the actual flower or plant.

Here’s the list:

A

  • AcaciaSecret love
  • Acanthus  – Art
  • Aconite – Misanthropy
  • Acorn – Nordic Symbol of Life and immortality
  • African MarigoldVulgar minds.
  • Agrimony – Thankfulness
  • AllspiceCompassion
  • Aloe – Grief
  • Almond (Common) – Stupidity. Indiscretion.
  • Almond (Flowering) Hope  – Promise, Hope,
  •  Almond (Tree) – Giddiness; heedlessness Stupidity, thoughtlessness
  • Alyssum (Sweet) – Worth beyond beauty.
  • Amaranth (Globe) – Immortal love
  • Amaryllis – Pride; Pastoral Poetry
  • Ambrosia – Your Love is Reciprocated
  • Anemone – Forsaken, sickness, unfading love
  • Apple Blossom – Preference, Fame speaks him great and good.
  • Apple (Thorn) – Deceitful charms.
  • Apricot FlowerDoubt, distrust
  • Arborvitae – Everlasting friendship
  • Arbutus – You’re the only one I love
  • Arum – Ardor
  • Asparagus – Fascination
  • Aspen TreeSighing, Lamentation
  • Asphodel – My regrets follow you to the grave
  • Aster Symbol of love, daintiness, talisman of love
  • Aster (China) – Fidelity, variety, I will think of you
  • Autumn Leaves – Melancholy
  • Azalea – Take Care, temperance, fragile, passion, Chinese symbols of womanhood

B Continue reading

primrose-2Scientific NamePrimula vulgaris, Primula veris
Common Name: Primrose, Cowslip, Key Flower, Herb Peter
Ruler: Freya
Planet: Venus
Element: Earth
Magickal Properties: Fairies, Protection, Love

Often associated with the month of February, the Primrose flower symbolizes patience, kindness and gentleness. The Primrose also brings the meaning of belonging, and nurturing. Primrose is used magically as a symbol to meditate upon to draw protection and love, Oil of primrose has been used to cleanse and purify in the Druidic tradition. This wildflower is also used to symbolize the beloved guest.

Primroses attract fairies to the garden.

  • To invite the fairy folk to visit and to get fairy blessings hang a spray of primroses on your door.
  • Eating primroses is said to help you see fairies.
  • In Ireland and Wales primroses were thought to be fairy flowers that could give the power of invisibility.
  • Celtic lore says rubbing primrose flowers over your eyelids can give you a way into the fairy world.

If you grow primroses in your garden, take very good care of them. Unhealthy primroses upset the fairies and it is not recommended to have cross fairies. If kept indoors, Primroses are said to bring sickness and sorrow, perhaps this is because they generally do not grow well indoors and upset the fairies.

The pendant flowers of the cowslip, Primula veris, were sometimes called “Key Flower” in England because they were thought to resemble a hanging bunch of keys. The association with keys may also have led to another common name, “Herb Peter,” because the symbol of St. Peter is a bunch of keys.  Ancient Norse peoples celebrated this primrose as a symbol of the goddess Freya, known as the “Key Virgin.”

According to the “language of flowers” Primroses symbolize youth or young love, or mean “I can’t live without you.” Lilac-tinted primroses signify confidence and red primroses symbolize unappreciated merit. In the Chakra System, it is believed that the Primrose combines the solar plexus and heart chakras.

The flowers of some primroses, especially Primula vulgaris, are edible. They can be eaten raw in salads or as an edible garnish, and can also be made into conserves (preserves). P. vulgaris flowers can be combined with yeast and sugar and fermented into wine.

 In traditional herbal medicine, cowslip wine, made from P. veris, was used as a sedative. When the flowers were boiled with sugar to make a syrup, the concoction was used to treat palsy as well as nervousness. The juice of the flowers, either used alone or combined with other ingredients into an ointment, was supposed to be effective at treating facial spots and wrinkles. An old gypsy cure for skin complaints on the face: take three primrose leaves and boil them in a pint of water, drink the water
Collected from various sources including Garden Guides

cosmos_4-2Scientific NameCosmos bipinnatus
Folk or Common Names: Mexican Aster
Type: Flower
Ruler: Jupiter
Element: Air
Month: October
Numbers: 2 and 8
Parts Commonly Used: The flowers
Magickal Qualities: Harmony; Order; Balance; Simplicity; Confidence

The name Cosmos comes from the Greek kosmos, meaning order, harmony, or the world.  The cosmos flower was said to have been named by Spanish mission priests in Mexico who grew them in their mission gardens.  The priests felt that because of their symmetrically aligned petals these flowers should be named after the Greek word for “ordered universe.” However, when one closely observes the plant, it not only expresses order and harmony in the blossom’s symmetry, grace, and simplicity, but also in the symmetrically balanced, regularly-doubled production of leaf and blossom stems.

The “cup” of the Cosmos in full bloom is exactly the shape of a dish antenna, and is even “aimed,” at the sky at much the same angle as these wave receivers. The fully-open Cosmos blossom often turns this “dish antenna” somewhat towards the sun. When the wind blows, the blossoms turn their undersides to the direction of the wind so that the inner, fertile disc is sheltered behind a round “parasol” of ray florets.

The gestural shape of the blossom, a broadly opened cup turned towards the sun and the heavens indicates a character of openness and receptivity to messages from outside of the earthly realm.

Because the name Cosmos comes from the Greek word for harmony and order, and the cosmos flower is generally thought to be the symbol of order, harmony, peace and modesty.

  • A gift of cosmos flowers will bring good luck.
  • When given as a gift to a romantic partner, these flowers are commonly meant to represent the notion of walking together hand in hand, or to express the joys that love and life can bring.
  • Plant them in your garden to attract fairies.
  • Spend time in meditation with the flowering plants in the garden, and to attune your mind to messages from beyond.

It is said that Cosmos flowers will attract fairies, particularly if grown in a “wild” or uncultivated corner of the garden. This is also the environment where Cosmos is most at home, roadsides and waste places being the natural habitat of this freedom loving flower. It is interesting to reflect that “roadsides and waste places” are recognized in traditional cultures worldwide, as sites for spiritual epiphanies, encounters with spiritual beings in disguise, vision quests, walkabouts, and other metaphysical and transformative experiences of the . . . Cosmos.

The Cosmos has a form and gesture that is graceful, airy, and mobile. It is responsive to every breath of wind or touch by another living thing. It opens outwards in a generous gesture, expanding, trusting, and risking.

At the same time, it is protective of its innermost, female reproductive parts until they are fully ripe and ready to be released. It has an expansive signature in its bounty of blossoms and multitude of seeds that emerge from each blossom.

The blossom’s color signature shows a yellow center, symbolizing a strong solar plexus chakra, with a radiating aura of mauve or magenta, which seems to symbolize the sacralizing of the will by spiritual awareness. This suggests aid to those who feel afraid to assert their will in the world, because they are never quite sure whether their motives are informed enough by the highest possible consciousness.

Along with their harmonious symbolism, cosmos are also representative of October births and 2nd wedding anniversaries, and are frequently given as simple tokens of affection on these particular events. In 1999 the World Kindness Movement in Tokyo adopted the cosmos bipinnatus as the emblem for the organization.

Medicinal and Herbal Uses:

Some botanical sources state that cosmos has “no known uses” (or hazards) as food or medicine, others catagorize it as a weed.  It seems extremely benign. Being both highly attractive to insects, and not causing any kind of allergies or skin irritation in humans, it is clearly lacking in irritants. Similarly, being scentless, it seems to lack any significant volatiles.

 Because it is attractive to lacewings, tachinid flies, hoverflies, and various parasitic mini-wasps, all of which prey on more destructive insects, the cosmos flower is a popular companion plant in many gardens.

Compiled from various sources including Flower Info and  The Flower Society

“Magic is only unexplained science. Science is explained magic. When I study science, I study magic. When I study magic, I study science.” ― C. JoyBell C.
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