Money

Wealthy Week

On a Sunday evening, burn a gold candle surrounded by piles of loose change. It is important not to count the cash. If there are so few coins you cannot help but notice, cover them with a handkerchief. Watching the candle flame, say:

“Thank you for the money I have already received from the invisible world.”

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Leave the candle to burn down and extinguish itself. Afterward gather up the coins. You will need them for the next evening’s spell.

On Monday burn a white candle in the same way, adding to the heap of coins any more you have accumulated throughout the day. Repeat words of thanks for money already received from the invisible world.

On Tuesday use a pink candle and add to the coin collection the loose change the day has brought you. Speak the magic words again.

Continue with the words and the same coins, adding daily to the pile. Use a red candle on Wednesday, a green candle on Thursday, a blue candle on Friday, and on Saturday a green candle.

Stash away your cash and reserve it for money spells. The more coins you accumulate, the greater the power of attraction.

(Of course, you can also throw the coins into your purse.)

Found in:
The Good Spell Book by Gillian Kemp

Romany Money Spell

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Place a small bowl or cup in a place you will see it every day. Hold 3 coins of any denomination in your dominant hand and say:

Trinka Five, Trinka Five,
Ancient spirits come alive.
Money grow and money thrive
Spirits of the Trinka five.

Toss the coins in the container. Repeat the spell daily, tossing 3 coins in the dish each day for nine consecutive days. Then continue doing the spell once a week until you have the money you need.

Spell by Madame Fortuna

Increase Money – Decrease Money Problems

ea0cab2b803683fe73b683b2fdc0e45aHere is a simple charm to Increase Money and Decrease Money Problems:

On the night of the crescent moon, place a coin on a windowsill with the head facing up. This encourages money to increase.

Leave it there until the moon is full, then flip the coin so the tails side is facing up. This encourages money problems to diminish.

Then, keeping in harmony with the moon phases, finish the spell by removing the coin on a new or full moon.

Hints and tips:

Any coin can be used for this charm. Wash the coin first in warm soapy water, and then rinse with fresh cold water. To increase the effectiveness of this spell, use a silver dollar, or a coin that has significance to you – such as a quarter from the state in which you live, or a coin minted the same year you were born, etc.

From: The Good Spell Book

Urgent Money Spell

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The Romanies say that when money is urgently needed by a certain date, this spell works wonders. One thing to remember: it must be performed at the witching hour of midnight.

Take one white votive (or tea light) candle to represent each $100 or $1,000 that you critically need. Stand them on a plate you often eat from.

At a quarter to midnight, sit in a room with no electric lights. Light a gold or silver, green or white candle (not one of those representing the needed money). This is the candle that will give power to the “money” votive candles and will enable you to see what you are doing.

Now work your magic. Pray for a circle of gold light to be placed around you for protection and for a circle of blue light to be placed around you for healing.

Pick up a votive candle and light it from the main candle flame. As you do so, say that the votive you are lighting represents the $100 or $1000 you need. Place on the plate to begin a circle of “money” candles.

Light each votive, and say the same words for each, until the circle is complete.

Say a prayer explaining that you are not being greedy; that the money is necessary. Leave the candles to burn out of their own accord. The money will soon start winging its way to you.

Found in:
The Good Spell Book

Money Drawing Oil

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Many Romanies roll their bills rather than keeping them flat. Smearing the outside bill with Money Drawing Oil is believed to attract cash.

Here’s a recipe:

  • 3 drops Wood Marjoram oil
  • 2 drops Lemon oil
  • 2 drops Eucalyptus oil
  • sweet Almond oil

Fill a small bottle (1 dram) half full of sweet almond oil. Add the essential oils and mix well. Store in a cool dry place.

Note: Wood Marjoram, Thymus mastichina,  is also known as Spanish Marjoram, White Thyme, Wild Marjoram or Mastic Thyme. It might be a little bit hard to find. Rosemary can be substituted.

Bringing Money Home

a4f26af883967c37ac0464c4fffe0366Here is a spell for bringing money right through your front door:

When the moon is new, sprinkle a $1, $10, $20 or $50 bill with cinnamon and then secretly place it underneath the front doormat inside your home.

It will be charged with positive energy every time someone walks over it. The greater the value of the bill, the larger your returns could be. The money should only be removed when the moon is full; otherwise you will attract unexpected expense to your door.

From: The Good Spell Book

Another Old Gypsy Trick

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Cauring is an old gypsy trick – here’s how it works:

The Gypsy has some queer, old-fashioned gold piece; this she takes to some goldsmith’s shop, at the window of which she has observed a basin full of old gold coins, and shows it to the goldsmith, asking him if he will purchase it. He looks at it attentively, and sees that it is of very pure gold; whereupon he says that he has no particular objection to buy it; but that as it is very old it is not of much value, and that he has several like it.

“Have you indeed, Master?” says the Gypsy; “then pray show them to me, and I will buy them; for, to tell you the truth, I would rather buy than sell pieces like this, for I have a great respect for them, and know their value: give me back my coin, and I will compare any you have with it.”

The goldsmith gives her back her coin, takes his basin of gold from the window, and places it on the counter. The Gypsy puts down her head, and pries into the basin. “Ah, I see nothing here like my coin,” says she. “Now, Master, to oblige me, take out a handful of the coins and lay them on the counter; I am a poor, honest woman, Master, and do not wish to put my hand into your basin. Oh! if I could find one coin like my own, I would give much money for it; barributer than it is worth.”

The goldsmith, to oblige the poor, simple, foreign creature (for such he believes her to be), and, with a considerable hope of profit, takes a handful of coins from the basin and puts them upon the counter.

“I fear there is none here like mine, Master,” says the Gypsy, moving the coins rapidly with the tips of her fingers. “No, no, there is not one here like mine – kek yeck, kek yeck – not one, not one. Stay, stay! What’s this, what’s this? So se cavo, so se cavo? Oh, here is one like mine; or if not quite like, like enough to suit me. Now, Master, what will you take for this coin?”

The goldsmith looks at it, and names a price considerably above the value; whereupon she says: “Now, Master, I will deal fairly with you: you have not asked me the full value of the coin by three three-groats, three-groats, three-groats; by trin tringurushis, tringurushis, tringurushis. So here’s the money you asked, Master, and three three-groats, three shillings, besides. God bless you, Master! You would have cheated yourself, but the poor woman would not let you; for though she is poor she is honest”: and thus she takes her leave, leaving the goldsmith very well satisfied with his customer – with little reason, however, for out of about twenty coins which he laid on the counter she had filched at least three, which her brown nimble fingers, though they seemingly scarcely touched the gold, contrived to convey up her sleeves.

This kind of pilfering is called by the English Gypsies cauring, and by the Spanish ustilar pastesas, or stealing with the fingers. The word caur seems to be connected with the English cower, and the Hebrew kãra, a word of frequent occurrence in the historical part of the Old Testament, and signifying to bend, stoop down, incurvare.

From: Romano Lavo-Lil

An Old Gypsy Trick

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The hukni is an old Gypsy trick – here’s how it works:

The Gypsy makes some poor simpleton of a lady believe that if the latter puts her gold into her hands, and she makes it up into a parcel, and puts it between the lady’s feather-bed and mattress, it will at the end of a month be multiplied a hundredfold, provided the lady does not look at it during all that time. On receiving the money she makes it up into a brown paper parcel, which she seals with wax, turns herself repeatedly round, squints, and spits, and then puts between the feather-bed and mattress – not the parcel of gold, but one exactly like it, which she has prepared beforehand, containing old halfpence, farthings, and the like; then, after cautioning the lady by no means to undo the parcel before the stated time, she takes her departure singing to herself:

O dear me! O dear me!
What dinnelies these gorgies be.

The above artifice is called by the English Gypsies the hukni, and by the Spanish hokhano baro, or the great lie. Hukni and hokano were originally one and the same word; the root seems to be the Sanscrit huhanã, lie, trick, deceit.

From: Romano Lavo-Lil

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